North Korea: soldiers dance for Kim Jong-un - video

North Korean soldiers sing and dance in Pyongyang

Troops flood into Pyongyang like Kids From Fame as their leader gets yet another title

LAST UPDATED AT 16:14 ON Thu 19 Jul 2012

THE NORTH KOREAN military and the Kids From Fame would appear to have little in common, but when soldiers in Pyongyang discovered that Kim Jong-un had appointed himself head of the army they could not keep their emotions in check, and flooded into the city's squares to dance and celebrate just like a troupe of performing arts students from New York.

Kim has now added the rank of marshal to his long list of titles and has tightened his grip on power in the secretive communist state. Although he was already the 'supreme commander' of the Korean People's Army his new role gives him even more control over the 1.2-million soldiers and comes after what many observers believe was a purge in the upper echelons of the North Korean regime.

Earlier this week vice marshal Ri Yong-ho, a close ally of former leader Kim Jong-il, lost his titles and was replaced as vice marshal of the army by the hitherto unknown Hyon Yong-chol.

The appointments seemed to go down well with the rank-and-file soldiers, who held a "dancing party" to "offer their highest glory and congratulations" to Kim, according to the official North Korean news agency KCNA.

"They represented the great joy and deep emotion as well as boundless trust in the supreme commander," it added.

However, their choice of music may leave something to be desired and is unlikely to feature on any playlists in the West this summer.

"It began with the playing of song Glory to Our Great Party," reported KCNA. "They danced to the tune of such songs as, Happiness of Being under the Care of Respected Supreme Commander, the Song of the Korean People's Army, The Twelve Months of Victory of Songun and The Country I Am Defending."

Troops also got down to other well-known party anthems including We Will Devotedly Defend General Kim Jong-un and the intriguingly entitled Footsteps.

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