Ex-wife defends drug professor who fell for Denise Milani

Paul Frampton, the academic jailed for smuggling cocaine into Argentina, is a naïve man who was smitten by a bikini model, says his ex.

LAST UPDATED AT 13:24 ON Thu 22 Nov 2012

THE British physics professor who smuggled two kilos of cocaine into Argentina thinking he was delivering a suitcase to a bikini model, is a naive man who "lives in the stars" and does not deserve his jail sentence, his ex-wife says.

Anne-Marie Frampton told the London Evening Standard the jailing of Oxford-educated Professor Paul Frampton for four years and eight months was "unjust" because he is the victim of a trap.

Frampton, 68, claims he was tricked into carrying the suitcase by gangsters who posed on the internet as Denise Milani, a 32-year-old Czech bikini model with whom he was infatuated. The academic, who was arrested in January as he tried to board a plane to Peru from Buenos Aires, believed he had formed a relationship with Milani after meeting a person he believed to be her on a dating site.

Ms Frampton, 71, told the Standard: "He’s naïve – he lives in the stars, at university, in calculations. He wouldn’t know what human beings can do, he wouldn’t even think about it."

Frampton says he fell victim to the gangsters because they were "very good and very intelligent," says the Daily Mail. "For 11 weeks I thought I was chatting with an attractive woman."

Frampton, who had been teaching physics at the University of North Carolina for more than 30 years, went to La Paz, Bolivia, thinking he was going to meet Milani for the first time. Instead he was met by a man who gave him the suitcase, saying it belonged to Milani.

The next day he travelled to Buenos Aires and was told to fly to Brussels to meet the model. But after waiting 36 hours at the airport for her to send him an electronic ticket, he decided to return to the US via Peru.

"It [the jail sentence] really isn’t just," Ms Frampton told the Evening Standard. "For the moment, everybody is just stunned." · 

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