Teacher who 'ran off with school girl' wrote about 'moral dilemma'

Married Jeremy Forrest, 30, wrote blog post entitled 'You hit me just like heroin' four months ago

LAST UPDATED AT 13:51 ON Mon 24 Sep 2012

A MARRIED maths teacher who is believed to have run away to France with a 15-year-old school girl wrote about having a "moral dilemma" four months ago.

Police are searching for Jeremy Forrest, 30, who is thought to have fled the country with teenager Megan Stammers.

In a blog post written in May, Forrest talked about a "moral dilemma" but said he had to be "a bit vague" about it in order for it to be "public-ally digestible".

Forrest said it had left him questioning how to define what is right and wrong and concluded "actually we get a lot of things wrong". He continued: "At the end of the day, I was satisfied that if you can look yourself in the mirror and know that, under all the front, that you are a good person, that should have faith in your own judgement."

The post was entitled 'You hit me just like heroin', which is also a song by Alkaline Trio - a band he later goes on to write about.

Megan is feared to have fallen for Forrest, who plays in a rock band under his stage name Jeremy Ayre, several months ago, reports The Daily Telegraph. On 27 June, he also posted on Twitter: "Me & You. Let's just run away."

Megan was reported missing on Friday after failing to turn up at Bishop Bell CofE School in Eastbourne, East Sussex where Forrest teaches. They were caught on CCTV boarding the 9.20pm Dover to Calais ferry.

Police have appealed for information from anyone who has seen them or his black Ford Fiesta.

Megan's dad Martin Stammers, 43, said: "We just want Megan to make contact with us. We are worried and miss her terribly. Please get in touch Megan."
 
He added: "It's been hell. We have no idea where she is."

Forrest, from Lewes, East Sussex, married Emily Faulder, a 31-year-old photographer, last year in Brighton. It is not clear whether the couple had split before he allegedly left with Megan. · 

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