Daily Briefing

Ten Things You Need to Know Today: Friday 10 Aug 2012

The Week’s super-quick catch-up on the main news talking points, available from 8am daily

London 2012
1. YET MORE: TEAM GB STILL WINNING
Britain's medal tally rose again today as both male and female sailing crews in the '470' class took silver. There are high hopes also for BMX bikers Shanaze Reade and Liam Phillips who race today and for diver Tom Daley who competes this evening. But disappointment struck for 10k swimmer Daniel Fogg who missed out on a medal.
2. TIA: POLICE SEARCH GRAN'S HOUSE
Police searching for missing schoolgirl Tia Sharp have sealed off an area near her grandmother's home in south London and begun a forensic search of the area. Earlier, officers spent around 30 minute inside the house with a police dog. Christine Sharp was then driven away by police, bags of evidence were also removed.
London 2012
3. CLOSING CEREMONY TICKETS MAY GO ON SALE
Locog, the Olympic organisers, have said that more tickets may be released for sale to the general public for Sunday's closing ceremony but not until the day of the event. There's uncertainty over the release because organisers won't know until the set for the show is put in place how many seats will have a satisfactory view of the stage.
4. NICOLA ADAMS: I WON'T TURN PRO
Nicola Adams, the flyweight from Leeds who yesterday made Olympic history as the first ever gold medallist in women's boxing, has said she won't turn pro as she's "happy with the amateur game" and wants to defend her title at the 2016 Games. She joked: "It would be nice to see what the opening ceremony there is like."
5. UK TO GIVE SYRIA REBELS £5M KIT
Foreign Secretary William Hague has announced the UK will give an extra £5m in practical aid to support Syria's rebels, mostly to the Free Syrian Army. The aid will not include weapons but will comprise medical supplies, radio and satellite kit and power generators. Rebels lost control of a key Aleppo district yesterday.
6. LIBOR SYSTEM 'NOT VIABLE' SAYS REPORT
A review into the fixing of the inter-bank lending rate Libor published its initial findings today. Chair Martin Wheatley says the current system is "not viable" and proposed pegging the rate to actual market data, not banks' estimates. Banks and other 'stakeholders' now have four weeks to comment on the findings.
7. GOOGLE PAYS $22.5M FINE OVER PRIVACY
Internet giant Google is to pay a $22.5m fine to US watchdog the Federal Trade Commission, the largest ever paid, for circumventing privacy protections on Apple's Safari web browser for several months to track the owners of Macs, iPhones and iPads. The search engine company made no admission of wrongdoing.
8. BATMAN SHOOTING MAN IS 'MENTALLY ILL'
A Colorado court has been told that James Holmes, the man alleged to have shot dead 12 people as they watched the new Batman film in an Aurora cinema, is mentally ill. The 24-year-old PhD student had sought help from a psychiatrist provided by his university. He once again seemed dazed as he appeared in court yesterday.
Pussy Riot
9. RUSSIAN DEPUTY PM: MADONNA IS A SLUT
Russia's deputy PM, Dmitry Rogozin, has called US singer Madonna a "moralising slut" after she showed support for local punk band Pussy Riot - imprisoned for singing an anti-Putin song - at a Moscow gig. Rogozin also objected to her support for homosexuals, tweeting: "Either take off your cross, or put on your knickers."
Film
10. HOT TICKET – AI WEIWEI’S NO-REGRETS DOC
Never Sorry first-time film maker Alison Klayman’s feature documentary about Chinese artist and dissident Ai Weiwei has opened in UK cinemas. The film charts Ai’s activism and art practice from his 2008 Sichuan earthquake campaign, to his preparations for the Tate sunflower seed installation, and detention by the authorities. “Riveting”, says Salon.