Daily Briefing

Ten Things You Need to Know Today: Saturday 25 Aug 2012

The Week’s super-quick catch-up on the main news talking points, available from 8am daily

1. ASSANGE ARREST PLAN SLIP-UP
A Metropolitan Police plan to arrest Julian Assange if he steps outside the Ecuadorian embassy has been accidentally revealed. A uniformed officer was photographed while holding the handwritten plan outside the embassy on Friday. The plan said: “Action required – Assange to be arrested under all circumstances.”
2. APPLE AWARDED $1BN DAMAGES FROM RIVAL
Apple has been awarded $1.05bn (£665m) in damages from smartphone rivals Samsung. An American jury ruled that several Samsung devices have copied key features of Apple's iPhone and iPad, infringing Apple's software and design patents. The verdict could lead to a ban on sales of key Samsung products.
3. ROMNEY 'BIRTHER' QUIP CONDEMNED
Mitt Romney has been accused of pandering to the 'birther' conspiracy theorists who question whether Barack Obama was born in the United States. At a campaign stop in Michigan yesterday, Romney said: “No one’s ever asked to see my birth certificate. They know that this is the place that we were born and raised.”
4. MET HINTS MCCANN INQUIRY CLOSURE
The Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police has hinted that the investigation into the disappearance of Madeleine McCann may be wound down soon. Observing that the inquiry costs "a significant amount of money", Bernard Hogan-Howe said: "There will be a point at which we and the Government will want to make a decision about what the likely outcome is."
5. ARMSTRONG STRIPPED OF TOUR TITLES
Cyclist Lance Armstrong has been stripped of his seven Tour de France titles and handed a lifetime ban by the United States Anti-Doping Agency. Armstrong, who continues to deny doping, chose not to fight USADA drugs charges, saying he is tired of fighting the allegations. The sport's governing body, the International Cycling Union, has yet to announce if it will follow the USADA lead.
6. SCOUTS AND GUIDES FOR CRIME HOTSPOTS
Traditional youth clubs including scouts, girl guides and police cadets are to be set up in 400 deprived inner city areas next month, as part of a government scheme to discourage youth crime, reports The Times. The £10m scheme will be unveiled in Tottenham, where riots broke out a year ago.
7. EMPIRE STATE GUNMAN IDENTIFIED
The man at the centre of the Empire State building shootings has been identified as Jeffrey Johnson, a disgruntled former employee of a women's fashion accessories store. Johnson shot dead a former colleague using a .45 caliber handgun before police shot him dead. Nine people were wounded in the shoot-out.
8. HEADS DEMAND GCSE RESULTS INQUIRY
Head teachers leaders' are demanding that education secretary Michael Gove sets up an independent inquiry into this year's GCSE results. In a letter to Gove and the exams regulator, the head of the NAHT union said there had been a "moving of goalposts" in the marking, leading to "question marks over [pupils'] future".
9. OXFORD PAPER 'SORRY' FOR POSH DATE GUIDE
An Oxford University student newspaper has apologised after publishing a guide to dating posh girls. The six-point guide to the "challenge" of winning over well-heeled females left Cherwell, the 92-year-old newspaper, accused of "misogyny". The article has been withdrawn and editors have said they are "very sorry" for publishing it.
10. MINISTER IN THIRD RUNWAY HINT
Housing minister Grant Shapps has signalled his support for a third runway at Heathrow, becoming the first minister to speak publicly on the issue. Shapps said if Britain is to remain a "great trading nation" then "all options need to be considered", including a "review [of]the airport capacity in the South East".