Daily Briefing

Ten Things You Need to Know Today: Friday 4 Jan 2013

The Week’s super-quick catch-up on the main news talking points, available from 8am daily

1. FALKLANDS: CAMERON REBUFFS ARGENTINA
David Cameron rebuffed Argentine President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner's demand for Britain to hand over the Falkland Islands yesterday, saying the islands' future was up to "the people who live there". The Sun retaliated for Kirchner's 'open letter' demand in The Guardian by placing a "hands off" advert in a Buenos Aires newspaper.
Welfare reform
2. LABOUR PROMISES JOBS TO UNEMPLOYED
Both sides of the political spectrum have criticised Labour's radical plans to give the long-term unemployed a "guaranteed" job for six months. Under the plan, anyone who refuses the offer would face having their benefits docked. The proposals, announced by shadow work and pensions spokesman Liam Byrne, would be financed by restricting tax relief on pension contributions for higher-rate taxpayers.
3. BRITAIN'S FIRST EVER HAND TRANSPLANT
Mark Cahill, 51, a former pub landlord from West Yorkshire, has become the first person in the UK to have a hand transplant. Doctors at Leeds General Infirmary said he was making "good progress" and can wiggle his fingers although he has yet to regain a sense of touch. Cahill had lost the use of his right hand due to an infection following gout.
4. RAIL: MPS OPPOSE PEAK-TIME FARE PLAN
The Commons Transport Committee last night demanded that the government rule out a plan to raise peak-time rail fares to "manage" passenger traffic by discouraging rush-hour travel. MPs said the plan to "spread demand" would be "a tax on commuters who have no choice on how and when they travel".
Sport
5. OLYMPIC CYCLIST KILLED IN ROAD CRASH
Olympic South African mountain biker Burry Stander, 25, has died in a road accident while on a training ride. Stander, who came fifth in the London Olympics and competed in Beijing in 2008, was hit by a taxi in Shelly Beach in KwaZula-Natal. Britain's Bradley Wiggins, Mark Cavendish and coach Shane Sutton have all recently been hit by cars.
Annecy shootings
6. SWISS GUNMAN FACES AL-HILLI QUESTIONS
A 33-year-old gunman who murdered three women and wounded two men on Wednesday in a rampage in the Swiss village of Daillon is to be questioned in connection with the killing in September of the British al-Hilli family in Chevaline, less than 100 miles away in France. There were "similarities", including the use of antique guns.
Business
7. TAX EVASION: OLDEST SWISS BANK TO CLOSE
Switzerland's oldest bank, Wegelin, established in 1741, is to close permanently after pleading guilty in a New York court to helping Americans evade their taxes. It agreed yesterday to pay $57.8m in fines and said it will "cease to operate as a bank". It had "willfully" sheltered $1.2bn for more than 100 Americans for 10 years.
Oscars
8. TORTURE: DID CIA MISLEAD BIGELOW?
The US Senate Intelligence Committee yesterday demanded more information about contacts between the CIA and the makers of 'Zero Dark Thirty', the Kathryn Bigelow film about the killing of Osama Bin Laden tipped for Oscars. Senators fear the CIA "misled" film-makers by suggesting that torturing prisoners produced vital clues.
9. BALOTELLI, MANCINI IN TRAINING MATCH BRAWL
The future of Mario Balotelli as a Manchester City player is in question following a serious bust-up with manager Roberto Mancini after the Italian striker recklessly tackled fellow player Scott Sinclair in a 10-a-side training match. Mancini was photographed grabbing Balotelli by his training bib. Bolotelli responded by pushing his boss away.
Film
10. HOT TICKET: ROMAN POLANSKI REVISITED
A retrospective of the work of controversial but critically acclaimed film-maker Roman Polanski has opened at BFI Southbank. Highlights include noir detective classic Chinatown, starring Jack Nicholson, and psychological horror film Repulsion, with Catherine Deneuve. Chinatown is "a timeless classic", says Empire. Repulsion is "stunning", says Time Out.