Daily Briefing

Ten Things You Need to Know Today: Wednesday 13 Feb 2013

The Week’s super-quick catch-up on the main news talking points, available from 8am daily

1. SAVILE VICTIMS SUE BBC AND HIS ESTATE
Victims of Jimmy Savile are to sue the BBC and the estate of the late DJ and presenter over sex abuse claims. Law firm Pannone said a writ had been issued at the High Court on behalf of 31 of his alleged victims. Seven or eight of the claims are also against the BBC. The firm said the number of victims coming forward "grows daily".
horsemeat scandal
2. HORSEMEAT SCANDAL: TWO UK PLANTS CLOSED
A Yorkshire slaughterhouse and a Welsh meat processing plant were forcibly closed yesterday after the Food Standards Agency found that horse carcasses had been used to make beefburgers and kebabs on sale in the UK. Environment Secretary Owen Paterson, who today attended a crisis meeting of EU farms ministers, said: "This is absolutely shocking".
US
3. OBAMA PLEDGES TO RESTORE US ECONOMY
President Obama used his State of the Union address last night to unveil plans to reignite the US economy with more investment in research and infrastructure, including the repair of 70,000 bridges, and help for the unemployed to get back to work. He called on Congress to raise the minimum wage and combat climate change and gun violence.
4. SIX ARRESTED IN HACKING PROBE
Six former News of the World journalists were arrested this morning as part of the police investigation into phone hacking. Detectives from Operation Weeting said they had information relating to a suspected conspiracy in 2005 and 2006. Three men and three women are being questioned, two of whom are currently working for The Sun.
US
5. LA COP'S LAST STAND: LOG CABIN IN FLAMES
Former Los Angeles police officer Christopher Dorner, 33, on the run after being accused of three murders, is believed to have died in a final shoot-out with police at a mountain log cabin in southern California. The charred remains of a body were found this morning after Dorner apparently shot himself before setting the cabin ablaze.
Welfare reform
6. GOVT WON'T GIVE UP WORK-FOR-DOLE POLICY
The government plans to extend its 'back to work' programme for the unemployed despite yesterday's Appeals Court ruling. Work and Pensions Secretary Iain Duncan Smith is said to have been left "frustrated" by the ruling in favour of Cait Reilly, an unemployed university graduate forced to stack shelves at Poundland for nothing.
7. NEW KATE BIKINI PICS PUBLISHED IN ITALY
Photographs of a visibly pregnant Duchess of Cambridge, wearing a bikini as she walks on a beach in Mustique with Prince William, have been published today by the Italian gossip magazine Chi. St James's Palace called it a "clear breach of privacy". The same magazine published pictures of her topless last year.
8. FRENCH POLS VOTE FOR GAY MARRIAGE
France's National Assembly yesterday voted 329 to 229 to approve a law allowing same-sex couples to marry and adopt children. The Marriage for All bill was backed by President Hollande's Socialists but opposed by conservatives. After provoking months of street protests for and against, the measure must now win Senate approval.
9. ACTRESS MARTINE MCCUTCHEON BROKE
Actress Martine McCutcheon, 36, star of 'EastEnders' and the Hugh Grant romcom 'Love Actually', has been declared bankrupt at Kingston-upon-Thames County Court. The 36-year-old starred most recently in 'Midsomer Murders' and a Danone Activia yoghurt ad. Her largest creditor was HM Revenue and Customs.
Games
10. HOT TICKET: BUG BLASTER RETROVIRUS
The virus-slaying videogame 'Retrovirus' has been released in the UK. Inspired by the 1990s hit 'Descent', it is set inside a computer where players act as antivirus bots dispatched to seek-and-destroy a dangerous virus in the system's inner workings. "Genius," says Gaming Illustrated.