Morrissey miserable after BBC’s ‘Iranian censorship’

Morrissey

Singer upset at edited interview - but is it really because of problems with EMI?

BY Tim Edwards LAST UPDATED AT 10:58 ON Wed 11 May 2011

Morrissey has hit out at the BBC for "Iranian censorship" of an interview he gave last month in which he insulted the royal family two days before the wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton.

In an interview with Radio 4's Front Row the week before the royal wedding, the former Smiths singer made headlines by calling the Windsors "benefit scroungers", adding: "I don't believe they serve any purpose whatsoever".

But as it turns out, this was just the tip of the iceberg.

In a statement on his blog, Morrissey now says: "If my Front Row interview sounded chopped and cropped, that's because it was. I had spoken fluently about the royal dreading, but an Iranian censorship confiscated all of my views.

"It is distressing, but in all manner of British media in 2011 we are only allowed to hear the same old thoughts and feelings expressed over and over and over again."

He went on to criticise the British television news media for "all but ignoring" the death of Poly Styrene, the X-ray Spex singer, in favour of "hours and hours of blubbering praise" of Kate Middleton.

"The message is clear," writes Morrissey. "What you achieve in life means nothing compared to what you are born into. Is this Syria?"

Morrissey is renowned for being prickly. But was it really "censorship" of his interview that made him so upset? After all, he has been interviewed hundreds of times over a career spanning three decades and journalists routinely edit their subjects' ramblings down to memorable snippets.

Perhaps the true reason, as he suggests later in his statement, is the fact that his new album, Very Best of Morrissey, is having distribution problems. Because of this, he writes, "I face my first ever non-chart placing - which I shall bear with dignity, although I could never be unkind enough to express my views on EMI's failings. It was John Lennon who coined the phrase 'Every Mistake Imaginable'." · 

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