Mumford and Sons beat Bieber again with six Grammy nods

British folk rockers are one of only six acts to get six nominations

LAST UPDATED AT 14:09 ON Thu 6 Dec 2012

BRITISH folk rockers Mumford and Sons have cemented their place as one of the biggest names in music after being nominated for six awards at this year's Grammys.

American acts Jay-Z, fun., Kanye West, Frank Ocean and Dan Auerbach from The Black Keys are also up for six gongs in what The Daily Telegraph describes as a "curiously male-dominated list of big-hitters".

Mumford and Sons' album Babel is nominated in the best album category and is also up for best "Americana" album, even though the band hail from west London. The I Will Wait has been nominated in the best rock song category.

Earlier this year it was reported that Mumford and Sons had overtaken Justin Bieber as the fastest-selling act in the US this year. They got another one over on the Canadian pop superstar with this slew of nominations, as he failed to get a single nod across all 81 categories.

Of all the acts with six nominations, New York indie-pop band fun. could be the biggest winners. They are contesting the four highest-profile categories: record, song and album of the year and best new artist.

Rihanna and Kelly Clarkson are the leading female nominees. They are both shortlisted in three categories.

Clarkson is up for record of the year. Her effort Stronger is up against Lonely Boy by The Black Keys, fun.'s We Are Young, Somebody That I Used To Know by Australian singer Gotye, Frank Ocean's Thinkin Bout You and We are Never Ever Getting Back Together by Taylor Swift.

Jack White, the former White Stripes frontman, picked up three nominations for his debut album Blunderbuss.

Other British acts to be nominated include Muse, Florence and the Machine, Coldplay, Paul McCartney, Calvin Harris and Ed Sheeran. The Who will receive the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award at the ceremony in February in LA. · 

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