Deep Throat's Linda Lovelace and the Hollywood twosome

Deep Throat's Linda Lovelace

Two films are being made about the notorious porn star – but is either equipped to get it right?

LAST UPDATED AT 11:02 ON Thu 2 Feb 2012

LINDA LOVELACE, porn's first superstar who later claimed she was a victim of gang-rape and forced bestiality, was so mired in controversy it's hardly surprising that Hollywood is making not one but two biopics of her life.
 
The Roman Catholic daughter of a New York policeman, Lovelace shot to fame in one of the world's most profitable films of all time, Deep Throat. Despite prompting bans and court cases, the 1972 X-rated movie about a woman's insatiable appetite for oral sex cost only $25,000 to make and earned an estimated $600 million.

It also had therapists predicting that it would set America's sexuality free.
 
But years later, Lovelace claimed her pornographer husband Charles 'Chuck' Traynor had held her at gunpoint, tortured, drugged and beaten her. She also made allegations of gang-rape, forced prostitution and being ordered to have sex with a dog on film. Following two divorces, she died in a car crash in 2002 at the age of 53 without a penny to her name.
 
One of the films, Inferno, directed by Matthew Wilder, has become tangled in the controversial lives of its own cast. Lindsay Lohan had been chosen for the role of Lovelace but has since been replaced by Malin Akerman because, what with Lohan's court appearances and rehab orders, she has become "uninsurable". Demi Moore, who was to play the feminist icon Gloria Steinem, had to be replaced by Sarah Jessica Parker after she was taken to hospital last week in the wake of her break-up with Ashton Kutcher.
 
The second film, Lovelace, directed by Rob Epstein and Jeffrey Friedman, will star Mama Mia and Mean Girls actress Amanda Seyfried.
 
But, as The Times asks today, does Tinseltown have the guts and guile to tell the full story of the woman who became an iconic name in the worlds of pornography and feminism, with Steinem among those who took up her cause when she published her memoir, Ordeal, alleging rape?

Catharine MacKinnon, Lovelace's lawyer, is concerned that when depicting the worlds of porn and prostitution, mainstream Hollywood film-makers habitually reach for stereotypes "that have nothing to do with women's experiences".
 
Eric Danville, a Lovelace biographer, says he doubts that a Hollywood version of her life will bare all. "It's a nasty story and it doesn't have a happy ending," he says. "But movies without happy endings don't tend to do well." · 

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