F1 noise row: Mercedes would have quit without V6 engines

F1 Mercedes team-mates Nico Rosberg and Lewis Hamilton

German firm could no longer justify investment in outdated V8 engines, says Daimler chief

LAST UPDATED AT 13:44 ON Wed 9 Apr 2014

MERCEDES are revelling in the new era of Formula 1, having seen their drivers win all three of this season's Grands Prix and registering back-to-back one-twos in the last two races.
 
And now the German manufacturer has claimed that it would have quit the sport had it not introduced the new, quieter V6 engines that have caused such a big noise among their critics.
 
F1 committed to using more fuel-efficient engines back in 2009, and a senior figure at Daimler, Mercedes's parent company, has now revealed that the decision convinced the team to stay in the sport, even though other marques, including BMW and Toyota were leaving.
 
Professor Dr Thomas Weber, who oversees research and development at Daimler, told the BBC that the new rules meant that technology used for F1 could also be applied to road car development.
 
"The key challenge for the future is fuel economy and efficiency and with the change in regulations F1 is the spearhead for development," he said.
 
"With these new regulations I can clearly convince the supervisory board that the [F1 team] are doing exactly what we need – downsizing, direct injection, lightweight construction, fuel efficiency on the highest possible level, new technologies and combining a combustion engine with an e-motor hybrid."
 
In another interview with Autosport he said critics of the new engines, including Bernie Ecclestone, "believe they can continue everything forever" but said that it was increasingly hard for engine manufacturers to justify their investment in the sport when outdated V8 engines were being used.
 
"It is already widely known that Renault would have left F1 if the V8 engines had stayed, while Honda would not be coming back in 2015 if the regulations had not changed either," adds Autosport.
 
However, the row over reduced engine noise rumbles on. The Times reports that Jean Todt, president of the FIA, F1's governing body, is prepared to make some concessions.
 
"Teams could introduce a system that would allow more exhaust noise as soon as next month at a two-day test arranged after the Spanish Grand Prix in Barcelona," says the paper.

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any one of the f1 drivers could win in a merc , back to the days when williams had the best car then beniton then ferrari ,its boring as hell ,am not giving this crap any more of my time

Ha, the amount of actual racing and passing this year has been fantastic. I can imagine if you're just looking up grid results after the race, you might be disappointed though. How can you bemoan the last race with HAM fighting off ROS on a softer set of tires?!

So basically they have taken away a lot that makes F1 great and fans get nothing in return. These hybrid engines sound like garbage, more DRS and KERS just turns it into faux racing, and the cars are absolutly hideous. The only thing this season has going for it is that the teams have really good and matched driver lineups. In the end though, F1 lost what made it distinctive and now instead of watching Vettel win every race, we get to see the only person more unpleasant dominate every race. I actually like Vettel now though since he isn't winning and called the new engines exactly what they are.

This season has the best driver lineups of any season I can remember. This may make it still worth watching, but these new rules have done a lot to make it suck.

You really are retarded.

there you go again still talking shit and not willing to back up your mouth. I'm still waiting you wanna back up what you said on IFLS

LOL why the hell is this retard following me across all of the sites that use Disqus??? Please explain to me your retarded thought process here .. I would wipe the floor with you, dickhead. I'd leave you crying, whimpering and begging for mercy.

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