Kaymer makes history with US Open win, an omen for Brazil?

Martin Kaymer

German becomes first continental European to win title after eight-shot Pinehurst romp

LAST UPDATED AT 11:58 ON Mon 16 Jun 2014

German golfer Martin Kaymer stormed to victory in the US Open, winning the title at Pinehurst by a massive eight shots.

The German, who led the tournament from start to finish, began the final round on eight under par, five shots clear of Ricky Folwer and Erik Compton. By the end he had extended his lead to eight shots over the same pair.

"The denouement to this event was not remotely exciting, which serves as a tribute to the imperious 2014 champion," notes The Guardian.

It was a performance that Tiger Woods would have been proud of, says James Corrigan of the Daily Telegraph. "Like the superstar duo of Woods and [Rory] McIlroy, Kaymer held the outright lead from start to finish. Nobody else but this trio have accomplished that in the last 30 years in any major," he adds.

The 30-year-old German produced "one of the great performances in the history of the majors," says Iain Carter of the BBC. "Kaymer's composed play over the weekend ensured he made the most of his sensational 65-65 start. Having built such a formidable cushion, he knew he could play sensibly but never abandoned his attacking principles."

With the Ryder Cup just three months away, the performance has guaranteed Kaymer a place in the European team.

That a German should come up with such a dominant performance during a World Cup has not gone unnoticed by the pundits.

"His ability to pull off any shot was such that he could probably take a penalty in Brazil if asked," says Rick Broadbent in The Times.

The Guardian notes that he has become the first player from continental Europe to win the US Open (Europe's previous winners come from Spain and the UK). With Germany's footballers tipped to become the first team from Europe to win the World Cup in South America, could Kaymer's triumph be an omen? · 

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