Is puppet in this Vodafone ad planning bomb attacks? - video

Egyptian prosecutor launches probe into claim Abla Fahita is sending coded messages to terrorists

LAST UPDATED AT 15:43 ON Fri 3 Jan 2014

EGYPT'S top prosecutor is investigating whether a puppet that appears in a TV advertisement for Vodafone is delivering coded messages about terrorist bomb attacks. 

Officials at the British phone company have been questioned about the puppet, which stands accused of sending covert messages to the outlawed Muslim Brotherhood, The Independent reports.

At first glance, the puppet – an elderly widow called Abla Fahita – appears to be an unlikely terrorist. The ad, which shows her trying to find a SIM card used by her late husband, also seems rather innocuous.

Fahita tells a friend that she has asked to use a sniffer dog at a shopping mall to help search for the missing SIM. She also discusses another character she calls Mama Touta.

Egyptian prosecutors were alerted to the ad's alleged subtext by a video-blogger and youth activist called Ahmed Spider. During an appearance on Egyptian TV, the 25-year-old claimed the mall and the dog were code words for the locations of bomb attacks. Mama Touta, said Spider, is a code word for the Muslim Brotherhood.

"These elements tell us that there will be a big mall and an explosion after a dog fails to find the bomb in a car," Spider said. Vodafone has denied the allegations. · 

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If I had to put up with annoying and long commercials like that, I'd probably want to blow something up also.

I wasn't sure if I was watching an ad or a new sitcom.

ffs

Sorry but I believe it. What a very odd scenerio.. why the F would a commercial for a phone include a widow calling someone to tell them they need a dog to sniff for a sim at a mall? How the f does that make any sense at all? It reeks of coded messages to me. If its true, maybe vodaphone needs a little American "liberation" and see if they want to keep trying that isht.

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