David Bowie and Stones turned down Olympic ceremony

Kate Bush also refused to take part in closing ceremony, but she’s still running up the charts

LAST UPDATED AT 12:53 ON Tue 14 Aug 2012

DAVID BOWIE, Kate Bush and the Rolling Stones all turned down the chance to appear in the Olympic Games closing ceremony, according to The Guardian. And The Who only agreed after being asked three times.

Organisers apparently wanted Bowie to perform Heroes but had to make do with a video montage of his classics instead. The 65-year-old has not toured since 2006, says the Guardian, and it was always an ambitious request to try to persuade him to participate,  even if Heroes was used as an unofficial anthem for Team GB during the Games.
 
Some of the artists who did perform took a lot of persuading. Some of the Spice Girls were reportedly reluctant to appear and The Who closed the Games with a medley of classics only after turning down the invitation twice. With plans to tour the USA in November, it was said to be the scale of the promotional opportunity that finally swayed to band to agree.
 
With a record peak audience of 31 million in the US and 26.3 million in the UK, the closing ceremony certainly offered an ideal opportunity for transatlantic promotion.
 
After performing on Sunday, Elbow and Emeli Sandé are in the top ten iTunes singles chart today. A Symphony of British Music: Music For the Closing Ceremony of the London 2012 Olympic Games made it to number two in the album chart, with the Spice Girls, Elbow, George Michael and Emeli Sandé also among the top ten albums.
 
But Kate Bush proved that you didn't necessarily have to be at the closing ceremony in person to give your music career a boost. The singer declined to appear but agreed that the organisers could use a remix of her song Running up that Hill in the finale. Today the single made it to number six in the iTunes chart and Bush has praised the ceremony as a "brilliant show". · 

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