Olympics can inspire Cameron to make a winning comeback

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Opinion digest: Cameron's Olympic hangover cure, doormat Clegg fights back, and praise for the Shard

LAST UPDATED AT 11:20 ON Wed 8 Aug 2012

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AUDACITY CAN CURE CAMERON'S OLYMPIC HANGOVER
BENEDICT BROGAN ON THE OLYMPIC AFTERMATH
The Olympics have been a welcome and wonderful diversion from our national troubles, says Benedict Brogan in The Daily Telegraph. The days of golden success have left us "exhilarated and united in a way that we can scarcely understand". A national hangover will surely follow, and for David Cameron, "the Olympic aftermath promises to be particularly difficult". The euro is going through another existential upheaval, his party is "having a fit of the vapours" and defeat in 2015 looks certain. Yet "his greatest task is to show that he is not impotent in the face of economic calamity". This means Cameron and Osborne, must find the audacity required to take decisions to boost the economy, even if that incurs political risk. It means, for a start, a third runway at Heathrow, new nuclear power stations, and more road-building. "The Olympics have surprised us with what we are capable of. Now Cameron must do the same."

EVEN A DOORMAT CAN ONLY TAKE SO MUCH ABUSE
MATTHEW NORMAN ON CLEGG AND THE COALITION
There comes a time in the life of the perpetually abused wife when, damn the consequences, all you want is to see her throw acid in the abuser's face, says Matthew Norman in The Independent. So "well done, Nick Clegg". There was petulance in his announcement that he would kill the boundary changes in revenge for the Tories slaying constitutional reforms. "Nick's mad as hell, he isn't going to take it any more." About time. He could and should have done this long ago, except that, like a doe-eyed 19-year-old Lady Diana, he seemed to enter this arranged marriage believing that love might blossom. "Clegg's role was to look innocent and pretty, and humanise Cameron". The traitorous humiliation must be excruciating, but to an extent Clegg has been an enabler in his abuse. Bullies only respond to bullying. Watching Clegg fight back isn't pretty, but finally "Clegg is playing the game as it has to be played".

THE SHARD IS A ST PAUL'S FOR OUR TIME
NORMAN ROSENTHAL ON LONDON ARCHITECTURE
The reactions to London's latest mega-structure have not been moderate, says Norman Rosenthal in The Guardian. Some have accused it of "slashing the face of London" others of screaming "with dazzling arrogance that money rules this city". But when have great buildings, since the Pyramids of Egypt, been "anything other than monuments to wealth and power"? In recent years, in this country and all over the world, power has resulted in many vulgar and nasty blots on the landscape. Finally, along comes something that is genuinely magnificent to look at - the Shard. "It is a masterpiece of visual design, by one of the great living architects, Renzo Piano." Elegant and as inspiring to look at as a great cathedral, it is arguably "the greatest and most beautifully skyreaching building to be erected in London since St Paul's Cathedral." Who cares whose money built it? · 

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