Indie band Weezer are offered $10m to split up

Online petition launched to raise money to get the US rockers to quit

BY Jonathan Harwood LAST UPDATED AT 16:15 ON Thu 7 Oct 2010

The American indie band Weezer is being offered $10m to split up by a disgruntled listener, who has launched an online petition to raise the money. James Burns is asking everyone who signs to cough up at least $12 to help pay off the band, fronted by Rivers Cuomo.
 
Burns says he was motivated to start the campaign out of concern for the wellbeing of fans who have been disappointed by the band's new material.
 
"If we reach at least $10m then we get a chance to possibly stop hearing about a shitty new Weezer album every goddamn year,” writes Burns at petition website The Point .
 
"Every year, Rivers Cuomo swears that he's changed, and that their new album is the best thing that he's done since Pinkerton, and what happens? Another pile of crap like Beverly Hills or I'm Your Daddy.
 
"This is an abusive relationship, and it needs to stop now. I am tired of my friends being disappointed year after year. I am tired of endless whimsical cutesy album covers and music videos. I'm sick of hearing about whatever this terrible... excuse for a band is up to these days."
 
Burns's chances of success appear slim, however. Two days after launching the campaign only 16 people had made a donation and Burns was still $9,999,685 short of his target.
 
The band is aware of the campaign. Weezer's drummer Patrick Wilson used Twitter to try to raise the stakes. "If they can make it $20m, we'll do the 'deluxe breakup'," he announced.
 
Weezer was formed in the early 1990s and enjoyed success with the songs Undone - The Sweater Song and Buddy Holly. The videos for both songs were directed by Spike Jonze and became popular on MTV. The clip for Buddy Holly was filmed and edited to look as though it was part of the TV show Happy Days.
 
The band's first album, one of three released with the title Weezer, established their reputation, but the follow-up, Pinkerton, was voted one of the worst albums of 1996 by Rolling Stone magazine. However, it attained cult status and sold almost 1 million copies. · 

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