Nick Cave and PJ Harvey sing impromptu duet

PJ Harvey; Nick Cave

A fan persuaded the two former lovers to sing during Nick Cave’s gig at London's Palace Theatre

BY Seth Jacobson LAST UPDATED AT 12:12 ON Mon 12 Oct 2009

Nick Cave, the renaissance man of rock, was reunited with his former lover PJ Harvey last night during a one-off gig to promote the publication of his second novel, The Death of Bunny Munro.

Cave and Harvey had a famously intense relationship during the mid-1990s, which inspired one of his darkest albums, The Boatman's Call, and which was rumoured to have left the Dorset-based Harvey heartbroken.
 
The Australian polymath - Cave writes and performs his own songs, acts, has written screenplays and scored the new Cormac McCarthy film The Road - was giving an evening of readings from Bunny Monro interspersed with songs at London's Palace Theatre. He was taking questions from the floor when an audience member asked if he'd perform again with his former muse if she were in the venue.
 
Harvey, who had previously sat unnoticed in a box next to the stage, made herself known to Cave at this point, and the singer said that while he would love to duet with her, he would only do so if she was up for it too. "If it was the other way round, I'd be mortified," Cave said.

Harvey acquiesced and came up on stage, and the pair sang Henry Lee, a haunting love song from Cave's Murder Ballads album. (This was despite a member of the audience suggesting to Cave that Fleeting Love would be an apt song for the reunion duet, to which Cave growled back: "You're a funny cunt".)
 
Cave was on fine form throughout the evening, telling the audience that he wouldn't finish the evening with a fourth and final reading from his book because "I read a whole lot of the fucking thing, with projections. Go and see Will Self in the back of Waterstones."

The Quietus website reports that he also confided why he no longer sported his impressive Zapata moutsache: "My wife found my stash of rohypnol, drugged me and shaved it off." · 

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