Top 10 romcoms of all time

Juno; Ellen Page

The First Post’s nominations for Top 10 romantic comedies - until ‘(500) Days’ came along...

BY Sophie Taylor LAST UPDATED AT 08:31 ON Tue 1 Sep 2009

The new American romantic comedy (500) Days of Summer, directed by Marc Webb, is being talked up as one of the best for years. If it's going to make it into the Top Ten Romcoms of all time, it will have to knock one of these of its perch...

JUNO, JASON REITMAN, 2007
Ellen Page as the wise-ass teenager who gets pregnant with her boyfriend and, on the verge of getting an abortion, decides to keep the baby and give it away for adoption. Its apparent pro-life politics - as with Knocked Up the same year - made it controversial. Screenwriter Diablo Cody won an Oscar.

FOUR WEDDINGS AND A FUNERAL, MIKE NEWELL, 1994
It's smart to knock English screenwriter Richard Curtis and leading man Hugh Grant. But, apart from the weakness of Andie MacDowell's performance, Four Weddings stands the test of time as one of the funniest British films ever made - and one of the most successful. It was overlooked at the Oscars, but cleaned up at the Baftas.

WHEN HARRY MET SALLY, ROB REINER, 1989
The fake orgasm scene in a diner (above) was improvised by Ryan: the famous follow-up - "I'll have what she's having," spoken by the woman at the next table - was Crystal's idea. No Oscars, though Nora Ephron won a Bafta for the screenplay.

WORKING GIRL, MIKE NICHOLS, 1987
Melanie Griffith plays the put-upon secretary who takes over from her female boss (Sigourney Weaver) when she has skiing accident. She climbs the corporate ladder - and falls in love with her employer's boyfriend (Harrison Ford). One of the first films to spot the comedy in a devilish women bosses - a theme picked up by The Devil Wears Prada in 2006.

ANNIE HALL, WOODY ALLEN, 1977
Neurotic New Yorker Woody Allen meets kooky, shirt-and-tie-wearing Midwesterner Diane Keaton in Manhattan and a roller-coaster love affair ensues. It won four Oscars including best film, best director, best screenplay and best actress for Keaton.

THE APARTMENT, BILLY WILDER, 1960
Jack Lemmon as the miserable office junior who lends his flat to his slimeball boss (Fred MacMurray) to enable him to have an affair with the gorgeous elevator girl (Shirley MacLaine) - who of course falls for Lemmon. It won five Oscars, including best film, best director and best screenplay.

SABRINA, BILLY WILDER, 1954
Tough guy Humphrey Bogart surprised everyone with his portrayal of the workaholic millionaire who sets out to distract his playboy younger brother (William Holden) from his infatuation with the chauffeur's daughter Sabrina (Audrey Hepburn) - and ends up falling for her himself.

THE PHILADELPHIA STORY, GEORGE CUKOR, 1940
One of MGM's finest hours, with Katharine Hepburn as the wealthy socialite about to remarry when her ex (Cary Grant) and a handsome tabloid reporter (James Stewart) roll up. Stewart and screenwriter Donald Ogden Stewart both won Oscars.

HIS GIRL FRIDAY, HOWARD HAWKS, 1939
Fast and furious screwball comedy with Cary Grant and Rosalind Russell as ex- husband-and-wife reporters. Based on the classic newspaper play, The Front Page. Billy Wilder remade it in 1974 with Jack Lemmon and Walter Matthau - but it proved no equal to Hawks's version.

BRINGING UP BABY, HOWARD HAWKS, 1938
If two comic masterpieces from the same director in two years sounds too good to be true, it was. The film was hated when it was first released and only became accepted over time. Grant gave one of his finest performances opposite Katharine Hepburn and a pet leopard  - the 'baby' of the title.

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