Mick Jagger becomes latest rock star to reject Cameron

Mick Jagger

Rolling Stones frontman pulls out of Davos tea party after suggestions he is a 'closet Tory'

LAST UPDATED AT 08:16 ON Wed 25 Jan 2012

MICK JAGGER has pulled out of a 'Great British Tea Party' at Davos, complaining that he was being used as a "political football". The Rolling Stones frontman had been recruited - along with internet inventor Tim Berners-Lee and model Lily Cole - to appear alongside David Cameron and Boris Johnson to promote Britain to potential investors.

It is understood Jagger objected to some of the news reports of his scheduled appearance before his fellow millionaires at the World Economic Forum. Readers of The Sun, for instance, would have been forgiven for thinking Jagger had joined the Conservative party.

"Mick's beloved late mum Eva was an active member of the Tory party and it has long been suspected that Sir Mick, 68, is a closet Conservative supporter," the paper reported.

"But this is the first time that the Sympathy for the Devil singer has appeared at any public event for a Tory Prime Minister."

Clearly irritated by the assumptions being made about his political sympathies, Jagger swiftly released a statement: "During my career I have always eschewed party politics and came to Davos as a guest, as I thought it would be stimulating. I have always been interested in economics and world events.

"I now find myself being used as a political football and there has been a lot of comment about my political allegiances which are inaccurate. I think it's best I decline the invitation to the key event and curtail my visit."

It's a familiar story for Cameron, who just before Christmas last year was rejected by another of his rock heroes.

The Smiths guitarist Johnny Marr banned the PM from liking his music, announcing: "David Cameron, stop saying that you like The Smiths, no you don't. I forbid you to like it."

Let's hope he has better luck with Lana Del Rey, the upcoming songstress for whom he proclaimed his fandom in a Sunday Telegraph interview at the weekend. · 

For further concise, balanced comment and analysis on the week's news, try The Week magazine. Subscribe today and get 6 issues completely free.