Uchitel tells her story as Tiger loses his Oz title

Rachel Uchitel

For the first time in his pro golf career, Tiger Woods holds no title

BY Sophie Taylor LAST UPDATED AT 12:10 ON Mon 15 Nov 2010

Tiger Woods has lost his wife and his number one ranking in world golf this year. Now he's lost his last remaining title - the Australian Masters.

Despite a spirited last round in Melbourne on Sunday, Woods was unable to catch Australian Stuart Appleby.

 

Today, for the first in his life as a professional golfer, Tiger has not one golfing title to his name.

 

At least when Appleby stole his crown on Sunday Woods was on the other side of the world from London, where the Mail on Sunday published a lengthy interview with Rachel Uchitel, the 35-year-old former casino hostess whose steamy text messages first got Tiger into trouble almost exactly a year ago.

 

Uchitel wanted to set the record straight, she told the paper: she was neither a hooker nor a gold-digging marriage wrecker.

 

She met Woods when she was working in Las Vegas, looking after VIP visitors to various casino nightclubs. She admitted her job entailed getting powerful men whatever they wanted - including girls.

 

"My job was to get the high-rollers, or whales ­ as we called them ­ into the club and give them anything and everything they wanted to have the best night of their lives ­ guys who would order 100 bottles of Cristal champagne in a night or even blow $500,000 on one night of partying.

 

"If they wanted steak, they got steak... And if they wanted girls, I¹d get them girls, though you have to understand I never got involved in that side of things. 

 

"Of course, some of the girls were hookers. And others would sleep with men for gifts. But I didn't force anyone to do anything. These were consenting adults. I was there to work and make money. It was strictly business."

 

She claims she earned up to $500,000 a year because she was very good at her job.

 

"I am not a whore," she said, "nor am I a girl impressed by money or fame. I have a brain and I came from money. I never needed any man's money."

 

She had left New York for Las Vegas after a difficult period in her life that began when her fiance, Andy O'Grady, died in the 9/11 attack. He worked as an investment banker in the South Tower of the World Trade Centre.

 

"If things had been different and 9/11 had never happened, my life would have taken a different course," she told the Mail. "I'd be fat and happy, living in a big house in Long Island with a load of kids."

 

Asked if she regretted sleeping with a married man, she replied: "Yes, of course. I will never, ever do that again." · 

For further concise, balanced comment and analysis on the week's news, try The Week magazine. Subscribe today and get 6 issues completely free.