Muhammad Ali's health 'fine' daughters say following rumours

Laila Ali posts defiant picture of former champion following claims boxer could die 'within days'

LAST UPDATED AT 11:59 ON Mon 4 Feb 2013

MUHAMMAD Ali's daughters have rubbished reports that the 71-year-old could die within days and can no longer speak, posting a picture on Twitter of him watching last night's Super Bowl with his fist in the air.

Their denials come after Ali's brother Rahman claimed the boxing legend, who has had Parkinson's disease for 30 years, was in a "bad way" saying "it could be months, it could be days".

Rahman told The Sun: "Of all the famous people who ever lived, he's the best. Everyone knows Muhammad Ali. He's up there with Jesus Christ." But he hit out at his brother's wife of 26 years, Loni, for cutting him out of his sibling's life.

He claimed: "My brother can't speak, he doesn't recognise me. He's in a bad way. He's very sick. It could be months, it could be days. I don't know if he'll last the summer. He's in God's hands. We hope he gently passes away."

The interview, in which Rahman admits he has not seen his brother since July 2012, inspired an outbreak of concern on social media with Twitter users imploring their friends to pray for the boxing superstar dubbed "the Greatest".

But speaking to AP, Ali's daughter May May said the former world heavyweight champion was doing well. "These rumours pop up every once in a while but there's nothing to them", she said. "He's fine, in fact he was talking well this morning."

Her sister Laila later uploaded a picture to Twitter of the Olympic gold medallist watching the Super Bowl and wrote: "My dad's health is normal! Here is a pic of him today! Thanks for all well wishes."

The rumours about Ali's health follow reports that football legend Paul 'Gazza' Gasgoine's life was in danger after he started drinking again. His agent Terry Baker told the BBC he needed immediate help. · 

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