Nadine Dorries on Celebrity: more ostrich anus than politics

Dorries's claim she would use reality show to raise political issues is rubbished by commentators

LAST UPDATED AT 15:24 ON Thu 22 Nov 2012

SUSPENDED MP Nadine Dorries says she is working as an MP again after being voted off I'm a Celebrity… Get Me Out of Here!, but her claim she would raise political issues while appearing on the reality show has been rubbished by commentators.

The Conservative MP for Mid-Bedfordshire told ITV's Daybreak programme this morning she resumed work as a local member using an office set up in her Australian hotel room as soon as she was voted off the show.

She also insisted she was granted a "month off" by then Conservative Chief Whip Andrew Mitchell, although she did not tell him what she would be doing in Australia because she had signed a confidentiality agreement. Mitchell was being "clever with words" when his office issued a statement denying he had given her permission to spend November in Queensland filming the series, she said.

Asked about the Conservative Party's decision to suspend her as a member of the Parliamentary Party she said it might be a precautionary measure because "the powers that be" believed she would talk about them and "not about the issues that interest me".

Before travelling to Australia she said the popular ITV programme was an ideal forum to raise awareness of issues such as reducing the time limit on abortions from 24 weeks to 20.

The Daily Telegraph's Michael Hogan says Dorries's bid to use the show as a political forum was an abject failure. "She lasted 12 days, won very few friends and changed nobody's mind about any issues," he writes.

The Guardian says "ITV viewers saw little of Dorries's political views but did get to see her eat items including a camel's toe, an ostrich's anus and some cattle genitals."

Dorries says her 12 days on the programme taught her "humility" and she believes all MPs should try eating the rear end of an ostrich because it's "a humbling experience". · 

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