Nick Griffin bankrupt, but BNP leader will stand as an MEP

Nick Griffin BNP

Party leader confirms bankruptcy, but says he'll stand for re-election and is writing booklet on debt

LAST UPDATED AT 11:28 ON Fri 3 Jan 2014

NICK GRIFFIN has been declared bankrupt, but the British National Party leader says his financial woes won't stop him standing for re-election as an MEP. 

Rumours that Griffin was bankrupt emerged this morning in a report posted on the website of the far-right splinter group, The British Democratic Party. The BNP leader subsequently confirmed his plight in a series of tweets.

In one, he wrote: "A note for all: Being bankrupt does NOT prevent me being or standing as an MEP. It does free me from financial worries. A good day!"

Two minutes later he added: "Party funds are not affected in any way. Our campaign in May will be our most professional yet & I will be lead candidate in the North West".

Griffin even managed to put a positive spin on his financial state, declaring that he is "turning the experience [of bankruptcy] to the benefit of hard-up constituents by producing a booklet on dealing with debt". He added: "No surrender!"

The New Statesman confirms that Griffin's bankruptcy does not bar him from standing for re-election as an MEP in May's European elections. But it adds: "Based on the BNP's recent electoral performance, the voters are likely to remove him in any case".

Griffin was declared bankrupt at Welshpool County Court yesterday. A BNP spokesman told Buzzfeed that the party's leader was left with substantial debt after a "dispute with a legal firm".

"This was a debt via a firm of solicitors that he has a considerable professional negligence claim against," the spokesman said. "They were offered a substantial amount every month as a settlement but rejected it. That's why we are where we are."

The spokesman added: "Nick's taken this on the chin for the party, he's going to be standing again, he's been brave." · 

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Intellectually bankrupt or morally bankrupt?

...both (obviously!).

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