Romney 'lied to help his friend cheat wife in divorce case'

Mitt Romney

As Boston Globe asks for testimony to be unsealed, TMZ is already claiming Romney lied under oath

LAST UPDATED AT 12:49 ON Thu 25 Oct 2012

MITT ROMNEY has been accused of lying under oath about the value of a company in order to help a friend engaged in a bitter divorce battle. As a result, the wife was allegedly cheated out of her fair share of the couple's fortune.

The Boston Globe will go to court today to argue that testimony in the divorce case between Tom Stemberg, co-founder of Staples office suppliers, and his ex-wife Maureen should be unsealed, because Stemberg has been a vocal supporter of Romney's credentials as the Republican presidential candidate.

The Globe argued its case yesterday, but the judge agreed to give lawyers for Romney and Staples time to review the 1991 testimony.
Robert Jones, a lawyer for Romney, said yesterday he does not anticipate objecting and asked a judge not to delay the hearing beyond one day, The Boston Globe reports.

This is a decades-old divorce case in which Mitt Romney provided testimony as to the value of a company,'' Jones said. ''He has no objection to letting the public see that testimony.'

But gossip site TMZ begs to differ. Quoting “multiple sources connected to the divorce", it says that during the Stemberg divorce trial, Romney testified that Staples was virtually worthless.

Romney, whose company Bain Capital helped found Staples, is alleged to have told the court that Stemberg was a dreamer and "the dream continues". He is said to have described Staples stock as "overvalued", adding: "I didn't place a great deal of credibility in the forecast of the company's future."

Romney's testimony is alleged to have resulted in a relatively small settlement for Maureen. TMZ's sources claim that just weeks after the divorce case ended, Romney and his friend went and cashed in their stock for a fortune: “Short story - Romney allegedly lied to help his friend and screw the friend's wife over."

The allegations – if proven – could have an impact on a tight presidential race. Romney trails Barack Obama among women voters and has been keen to present himself as female-friendly. · 

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