Duck & Waffle serves up high-altitude London dining

Jaw dropping views make it a delightful experience, but the wine prices might give you vertigo

LAST UPDATED AT 07:54 ON Tue 4 Sep 2012

What you need to know
Duck & Waffle has recently opened on the 40th floor of the Heron Tower at 110 Bishopsgate in the City of London. It is run by the company behind the  Brazilian-Japanese fusion restaurant chain Sushisamba.
 
The food is modern European and British. There are small tasting plates of oysters, rabbit rillettes and a fois gras ‘all day breakfast’. Mains include the signature Duck & Waffle - confit of duck with a fried duck egg and a maple syrup and mustard waffle.
 
Small plates range from £5 to £10, mains from £10 to £32 for a whole roast chicken with truffle and potatoes. Wines start at £25. Tel: 020 3640 7310.

What the critics like
This place has “jaw-dropping views and a delightful atmosphere”, says Lisa Markwell in The Independent. There are plenty of enticing dishes on the eclectic menu from crispy pigs’ ears to spiced lamb cutlets with smoked aubergine purée and “sublime” torrejas (Spanish-y French toast with maple-caramel apples). The experience is “faultless”.
 
It’s quieter than its sister restaurant Sushisamba two floors below and offers bejeweled views over London, says Jay Rayner in The Observer. Except for the whole roast chicken, lobster or sea bream, everything costs about a tenner, ”which amounts to value for the food and the view”.
 
It’s not just the altitude or the views that make dining at the top of the Heron Tower such an experience, says Padraig Coffey on View London. Duck & Waffle is also one of the few London restaurants serving an inventive blend of British, French and Spanish styles “at very competitive prices”.
 
What they don’t like
The affordable food makes the wine prices a sharp knee to the groin, says Jay Rayner. A couple of bottles are around £25 to £30 but “most people would have to be on Bob Diamond's severance payment to afford the rest”. · 

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