Bridget Christie reviews – a 'pretty much flawless' show

Bridget Christie's An Ungrateful Woman

'Edgily funny' stand-up show An Ungrateful Woman heralds comic's return to Edinburgh

LAST UPDATED AT 07:32 ON Tue 12 Aug 2014
What you need to know

Stand-up comic Bridget Christie, the toast of Edinburgh last year with her show A Bic For Her, is back in the Scottish capital with a new effort - An Ungrateful Woman.

Like her show of 2013, which won a handful of gongs including the coveted Foster's Edinburgh Comedy Award, An Ungrateful Woman is a sharply comedic attack on modern misogyny. However, this time she aims at a wider range of targets and devotes a central plank to the horrors of female genital mutilation.

An Ungrateful Woman runs until 25 August, at The Stand.

What the critics like

The Guardian's Brian Logan particularly enjoyed a "fantastically sarcastic sequence", in which Christie skewers columnist James Delingpole's claim that British sexism is better than Saudi sexism.

Mark Monahan of the Daily Telegraph loved the same "edgily funny and morally on-the-nose" passage, in which a teenage girl, stalked by a night-time predator, waves a union flag to celebrate the supposedly less aggressive nature of her imminent rape. Monahan crowns the overall production as "pretty much flawless".

Veteran arts commentator Mark Lawson says the very nature of the work plays to Christie's "great strength as a comedian" - namely the "seamless interleaving of character and campaigner, exaggeration and fact".

What they don't like

Some of the material, including a dig at snooker's Steve Davis, sees Christie "sticking too closely to a formula", says Bruce Dessau of the The Evening Standard. And Time Out's Jonny Ensall agrees that when Christie "hits out at acknowledged berks" such as "Twitter trolls; the right-wing press; the Tory cabinet" the jokes became "more generic". 

The Times's Alex Hardy says the show "falls slightly short of having the punch of last year's" effort. · 

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