Police chief tells of 'grown men crying with remorse' on NYE

Superintendent’s tweets reveal cells were full by 3.30am on long New Year’s night of alcohol-fuelled revelry

LAST UPDATED AT 13:14 ON Wed 2 Jan 2013

A PICTURE of Britain celebrating New Year’s Eve by drinking, brawling and crying in police cells has emerged from a police chief’s series of tweets which range from the disturbing to the funny.

Superintendent James Tozer tweeted from 5pm on New Year’s Eve to 7am New Year’s Day from Monkmoor police station in Shrewsbury, Shropshire, The Times reports.

After locking up his first accused at 9pm for possessing an offensive weapon, Tozer wrote: "The gentleman who decided to assault another in front of us is repenting in the cells. Lesson learned."

By 1.30am the behaviour had become worse: "Now en route to Pontesbury — 20 people fighting... that’s nearly the whole village then."

At 3.30am the cells were full from "drink-related arrests", and Tozer catalogued the varying states of distress the accused were in. "Tonight I have seen grown men crying in the cells with remorse (or self pity) and I have seen raging bulls refusing to see reason,” he wrote. “I have seen people wanting to fight the world with the strength of 10 and enough alcohol on board for 10 too."

Tozer did manage to lighten the tone with one witty exchange with a citizen arrested for drink-driving, who apparently claimed "it can’t be me - I don’t have a licence". Five minutes later Tozer added: "Now trying to find the owners of two cars he drove into..."

At 4am Tozer tried to raise spirits with a festive message: "Has everyone forgotten already: it's a HAPPY new year," but half an hour later his concern returns with a final message. "It’s been a night of alcohol related... now what’s the word? Well actually it’s stupidity."

Early reports claim that arrests were down in Devon, Cornwall, Northumbria, Tyneside, Oxfordshire and Jersey, while in London the Metropolitan Police said 96 people were arrested on New Year’s Eve, mainly for drunkenness and assault. · 

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