Met police deleted records of sex and race discrimination

The Metropolitan police

Staff were ordered to delete details of discrimination against black female firearms officer

LAST UPDATED AT 11:52 ON Wed 2 Jul 2014

The Metropolitan Police discriminated against Carol Howard, a black female officer in the Diplomatic Protection Group, according to a tribunal which also found that records of the case were deleted on orders from within the force.

The tribunal ruled that Howard's supervisor, Inspector Dave Kelly, had "victimised" the only black woman under his command.

"She was singled out and targeted by him for almost a whole year," the judgment said. "On his own admission he had formed a negative view of her from very early on.

"He doubted her honesty and her ability. He has not put forward any credible basis for forming such a view."

The firearms officer was subjected to a range of unfair treatment, the BBC says. "Her commitment was challenged in front of colleagues, her every absence was assumed not to be genuine and her application for an armed response vehicle role was not supported."

Howard filed a formal complaint against Kelly in November 2012, but "an officer looking at her complaints was asked to delete references in a report into discrimination related to race or sex".

According to the Daily Telegraph, the officer removed the claims "not because they were not supported by evidence in the report, but because the claimant had brought a complaint of race and sex discrimination in the tribunal".

Kiran Daurka, Howard's lawyer, described the tribunal's conclusions as "a damning indictment" of the force. She called for "a complete rewrite of the Metropolitan Police's equality procedures and an independent investigation into existing measures purporting to deal with discrimination complaints".

Scotland Yard expressed disappointment at the ruling, but said it would "take forward any learning or actions as appropriate". · 

For further concise, balanced comment and analysis on the week's news, try The Week magazine. Subscribe today and get 6 issues completely free.