Plebgate: Met PC pleads guilty over false witness account

PC Keith Wallis admits misconduct in public office after lying to local MP about Andrew Mitchell row

LAST UPDATED AT 13:55 ON Fri 10 Jan 2014

THE only police officer to be charged over the "plebgate" affair admitted misconduct in public office at the Old Bailey today.

Metropolitan PC Keith Wallis, 53, pleaded guilty for falsely claiming to have witnessed a row between then-cabinet minister Andrew Mitchell and police in Downing Street in September 2012.

The "plebgate" affair sparked a huge row between Scotland Yard and Downing Street and resulted in Mitchell losing his role in the cabinet, reports The Guardian.

Mitchell was accused of swearing at police officers and using the word "pleb" when he was stopped from cycling through Downing Street's main gates by another officer, PC Toby Rowland.

The former chief whip vehemently denies that he swore directly at police or used the word "pleb". Mitchell is being sued for libel by Rowland over comments he made following the incident.

In the following days Wallis sent an email to his local MP John Randall, then-Conservative deputy chief whip, falsely stating he had witnessed the row.

Today the court was told the diplomatic protection group officer had admitted his guilt in a police interview before pleading guilty at the earliest opportunity.

Wallis has been bailed for sentencing on 6 February, pending psychiatric reports, and will reportedly offer to resign.

Met commissioner Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe apologised to Mitchell, who said he was pleased "justice had been done" but that unanswered questions remained.

In a statement, Hogan-Howe said Wallis's actions had damaged public trust and confidence in the police and in the integrity of his officers.

"I expect my officers to serve the public without fear or favour, where officers break the law they must expect to be held to account and answer for what they have done," he said.

Four other officers are facing gross misconduct hearings later this year relating to the "improper disclosure of information". · 

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This cop should not have to resign. He should be sacked. I don't like any politicians and I wish they all could be sacked but at least they lie because they're paid to and are merely doing their jobs.
The police often have tough work to do and that clown Wallis does not help them with his blatant lie, especially in a time when the police have lost a lot of the public's trust. For the sake of how he's damaged the reputation of his colleagues, and the public's trust, he needs to be made an example of.
Maybe he's a member of the same lodge as Rowland and therefore saw it his duty to back a fellow Mason. I can't see why else he'd be willing to lie and cost another man his job, unless he is attracted to Rowland sexually. Be either supposition as it may, Wallis caused Mitchell his job, without evidence, let alone proof of the matter. That was wrong.
Politicians are a devious lot. So there's no way I think Mitchell would be so stupid as to call anyone a pleb even if he believed it.
When the police resort to lies, where can we the public turn?
It is only Rowland's word or that of Mitchell which is true. As Walis has admitted he has he lied, it doesn't say much for Rowland. It tells us plainly that they were accomplices in the lie.
Rowland knew from the outset that Wallis lied. So why didn't Rowland expose that lie from the outset? Maybe he plans to become a politician too!
Rowland ought to have from the outset exposed it as a lie, especially knowing that it would condemn Mitchell in the public's sight? Kinda obvious why, yet this man has the audacity to sue Mitchell!
I've never voted tory and I never will. But I'd give Mitchell the benefit of the doubt because he has obviously been the victim in this conspiracy. I think if there was any justice, Rowland ought to be sacked too. I don't think either of them are fit to be in the police force.
If I were in the police force I know I'd be livid at the pair of them.

Yep; He should be sacked and lose his pension. If allowed to resign he will be able to claim his pension when reaching retirement age. But hey; they don't half look after one another even when disrepute is flying around. Bit like the thieving expenses politicians (most of them), Lords and Commons, who are still in office really.

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