Videos: canal bank collapses and hospice is flooded as gales lash UK

Nov 23, 2012

Videos show chaos across Britain as torrential rain causes flooding (and more is on the way)

Matt Cardy/ Getty Images

Flooded fields and roads in the Somerset Levels, which are particularly prone to flooding. Floods have also hit the central belt of Scotland.

TORRENTIAL rain and strong winds battered the UK again last night, leaving parts of the West Country, Wales and Scotland flooded. A man was killed in Chew Stoke, Somerset, yesterday after he became trapped in his car while trying to cross a swollen ford.

This morning, at least 100 flood warnings had been issued across Britain by the Environment Agency. A Downing Street spokeswoman estimated that 300 properties in England and Wales had been flooded in the past 24 hours and thousands have been left without power. Some relief from the poor weather was expected today, but forecasters warn conditions will worsen over the weekend.

The Met Office said "more heavy rain and strong to gale force winds" will hit on Saturday, although there is some uncertainty about which areas of the UK will be worst affected. South-eastern coastal counties of England are likely to be hit by gusts of 60 to 70mph and further flooding is expected in the South West and Scotland, as rain falls on already waterlogged ground.

Here are three videos which show the damage done by flooding already:

St Mary's Hospice in Ulverston, Cumbria, was forced to evacuate its patients after a nearby stream swelled to breaking point and flooded the building.

A witness captured the moment an embankment of the Grand Western Canal in Tiverton, Devon, collapsed. The surrounding area was flooded with millions of gallons of water, forcing 20 families to flee their homes.

The Midlands, South West and Wales bore the brunt on Thursday. In North Wales rescue vehicles struggled to get to where help was needed and in Birmingham, a roof blew off a mosque, damaging three cars but missing passersby.

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