Pro-gun children's picture book met with disbelief in America

Goal was to provide a 'wholesome family book' showing guns as the best means for self-defence

LAST UPDATED AT 10:16 ON Tue 5 Aug 2014

A children's book about the joys of openly carrying guns has been met with disbelief and derision in the United States.

My Parents Open Carry, by Brian Jeffs and Nathan Nephew, follows 13-year-old Brenna and her parents on a "typical Saturday running errands and having fun together". But what is not so typical, say the authors, is that Brenna's parents lawfully and openly carry handguns for self-defence.

Jeffs and Nephew were inspired to write the book after looking for pro-gun children's books and failing to find any. "Our goal was to provide a wholesome family book that reflects the views of the majority of the American people ie that self-defence is a basic natural right and that firearms provide the most efficient means for that defence," they say.

In case that wasn't enough to entice readers, they also offer – for a limited time only – a free copy of Doug Giles' book Raising Boys Feminists Will Hate.

The authors' website insists it has drawn positive reviews. James Towle, host of the American Trigger Sports Network, calls it "outstanding" and "long overdue", while John Roshek, founder of the Citizens League for Self-Defence, adds: "Loved it, I ordered a copy for our school's library."

But Elizabeth Laws, a children's book publisher, said it was the first time in 25 years that a children's book had left her "speechless".

Jezebel describes the "nightmarish" book as a "MUST READ for any tiny gun nut", pointing out that approximately 10,000 American children are injured or killed in gun incidents each year. Raw Story calls it "a primer for the children of gun nuts who'll be lucky to see their tenth birthday".

It also prompted several satirical reviews on Amazon. "Are you worried that your kids will grow up believing they can rely on law enforcement for protection? Or that they'll think wearing guns as accessories is a bad idea?" writes one reviewer. "Well, then look no further! With the notable lack of a Seussian rhyming meter (because this s*** is serious, and nothing rhymes with 'AK-47'), this book will help teach your kids that intimidating other people is A-OK, as long it makes you feel safe." · 

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