Muslim Brotherhood will be 'finished', says Sisi

Egypt's ex-army chief and leading presidential candidate, Abdel Fattah al-Sisi

Leading presidential candidate says Muslim Brotherhood will have no place in Egypt

LAST UPDATED AT 15:33 ON Tue 6 May 2014

THE former head of the Egyptian army, Abdul Fattah al-Sisi, has said the Muslim Brotherhood is ‘finished’ in Egypt and will have no place in the country if he is elected president on 27 May.

Speaking in the first television interview of his election campaign, Sisi accused the Brotherhood of using militant groups to promote violence and instability.

“There will be nothing called the Muslim Brotherhood during my tenure,” he said. “They only want to sabotage Egypt and this won’t be allowed. We’re talking about a country going to waste and people must realise this and support us.”

Al Jazeera describes the comments as “a seemingly unequivocal rejection of any political reconciliation with the Brotherhood, which was Egypt's most powerful political force until Sisi removed Morsi last summer”.

The Muslim Brotherhood has been subjected to an aggressive military crackdown since the fall of Morsi. Sisi blames the group for a series of bombings and shootings which have claimed the lives of hundreds of Egyptians.

The group denies any connection with the attacks, but it was blacklisted as terrorist organisation last December. At least 16,000 people have been imprisoned and 2,500 killed in government action against it, according to The Guardian.

Nor has the crackdown been limited to Muslim activists.

“A number of prominent secular activists have been arrested in recent months, several of them under a draconian new law banning all protests without a police permit,” the AP reports.

It says that Sisi’s candidacy has “raised concerns among some secular activists over a return of the autocracy that reigned in Egypt under Mubarak, who was also a veteran of the military”. · 

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Looks like Egypt is heading back to the dark ages,so much for the "arab spring"

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