Nelson Mandela quotes: from outlaw to president

‘When a man has done what he considers to be his duty to his people and his country, he can rest in peace’ – Nelson Mandela

LAST UPDATED AT 11:52 ON Fri 6 Dec 2013

On bravery: "I learned that courage was not the absence of fear, but the triumph over it. The brave man is not he who does not feel afraid, but he who conquers that fear."
 
On education: "Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world."
 
On apartheid: “I knew as well as I knew anything that the oppressor must be liberated just as surely as the oppressed”

On the law: “When a man is denied the right to live the life he believes in, he has no choice but to become an outlaw.”

On fame: "That was one of the things that worried me – to be raised to the position of a semi-god – because then you are no longer a human being. I wanted to be known as Mandela, a man with weaknesses, some of which are fundamental, and a man who is committed."
 
On freedom: "To be free is not merely to cast off one's chains, but to live in a way that respects and enhances the freedom of others."
 
On failure: "Do not judge me by my successes, judge me by how many times I fell down and got back up again."
 
On South Africa: "In my country we go to prison first and then become president."
 
On race: "I detest racialism, because I regard it as a barbaric thing, whether it comes from a black man or a white man."
 
On learning: "There is nothing like returning to a place that remains unchanged to find the ways in which you yourself have altered."
 
On imprisonment: “Prison itself is a tremendous education in the need for patience and perseverance. It is above all a test of one's commitment.”
 
On death: "Death is something inevitable. When a man has done what he considers to be his duty to his people and his country, he can rest in peace. I believe I have made that effort and that is, therefore, why I will sleep for the eternity.”

Nelson Mandela obituaries: from tribal prince to world statesman · 

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