In Review

What’s on this weekend? From Honey Boy to Amélie

Your guide to what’s worth seeing and reading this weekend

The Week’s best film, TV, book and live show on this weekend, with excerpts from the top reviews.

TELEVISION: The BBC Prime Ministerial Debate

Host Nick Robinson for the New Statesman

“I am not short of advice. In fact, it is coming in thick and fast. ‘Ask Boris Johnson why he’s such a liar,’ says one friend. ‘Ask Jeremy Corbyn why he loves our enemies and hates our friends,’ says another. They may be disappointed by what I’m planning for The BBC Prime Ministerial Debate on 6 December. I don’t see my job as giving the man who’s currently got the job, or the man who wants it, a ‘grilling’. My aim is to make sure they address the questions posed by members of the audience. I want to limit the time they spend delivering ‘oven ready’ soundbites drafted and redrafted by their spin doctors.”

Friday 6 December, 8.30pm on BBC One

MOVIE: Honey Boy

Alex Godfrey for Empire

“Shia LaBeouf has always seemed tinged by mania, on and off the screen…It’s hard to recall any other film that does what this does, an actor laying himself bare like this, in terms of both the script and his own performance as his father — there are levels and levels and levels. With almost every role of his career, LaBeouf has seemed like he’s on fire. To some degree, this fascinating piece of work explains why.”

In cinemas 6 December 

BOOK: Free, Melania by Kate Bennett

Poppy Noor for The Guardian

“Melania Trump is an enigma, but a new book by Kate Bennett, a CNN reporter who spent years following the first lady, promises to give the unofficial, unauthorised account of who she really is. Is she really Donald Trump’s prisoner? Or is she, as the book asks, ‘a woman who spent her childhood and formative years in a poor communist country, who speaks five languages, who privately spends her time visiting sick children … a fierce protector of her child?’”

Published 3 December

STAGE: Amelie

Fiona Mountford for The Telegraph

“There’s a wonderfully wistful sense to Michael Fentiman’s quietly confident production; it takes gumption for a musical to be this dialled-down. It’s a strategy that is amply rewarded by a satisfying depth and texture and all-round rapt holding of audience breath when Amélie and Nino finally get the chance to sing at each other. Madeleine Girling’s playful design evokes a classic French bistro as well as a big station and the two onstage pianos ingeniously open up to become, in turn, a tobacconist’s counter, a grocer’s stall and a display case in the sex shop where Nino works. Yes, sex shop, as even charming whimsy requires the occasional dose of grit.”

Until 1 February at The Other Place, London

Recommended

The books which should be on your reading bucket list
Books
In Depth

The books which should be on your reading bucket list

Bridgerton review: where Jane Austen meets Dallas
Bridgerton Netflix
In Review

Bridgerton review: where Jane Austen meets Dallas

Albums of the week
J.T. by Steve Earle & the Dukes
In Review

Albums of the week

Book of the week: A World Beneath the Sands by Toby Wilkinson
A World Beneath the Sands by Toby Wilkinson
In Review

Book of the week: A World Beneath the Sands by Toby Wilkinson

Popular articles

How scientists developed a Covid-19 vaccine in record time
A nurse prepares a dose of the Oxford/AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccine
In Focus

How scientists developed a Covid-19 vaccine in record time

Stalin-themed kebab shop closes after one day
Tall Tales

Stalin-themed kebab shop closes after one day

Why Italy’s government is on the verge of collapse
Matteo Renzi holds a press conference
Getting to grips with . . .

Why Italy’s government is on the verge of collapse

Free 6 issue trial then continue to