In Depth

What does the future hold for Archie Mountbatten-Windsor?

The seventh in line to the British throne may well grow up to have a Canadian accent

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex are set to begin a new life in North America along with their son Archie Harrison Mountbatten-Windsor.

And that means the eight-month-old is likely to have a very different upbringing to those of his cousins, Prince George, Princess Charlotte and Prince Louis. So how might such a childhood look?

As The Telegraph notes, Prince Harry and Meghan Markle made it clear from the off that they wanted to bring up their son as a “private citizen”. As such, he is simply “Master” Archie, rather than a prince.

Majesty magazine’s managing editor Joe Little believes this was an early indication that the couple might step back from their roles as senior royals. “The fact Archie isn’t Earl of Dumbarton or styled HRH makes me wonder whether this wasn’t already part of a wider masterplan,” Little says.

If the untitled young royal is to be educated in Canada, “it would break a long tradition of British Royals at British schools”, says The Telegraph, which notes that Prince Harry is among the many members of the family who attended Eton.

The newspaper suggests that instead, Archie might find himself “rubbing shoulders with well-heeled expats at international school”.

According to the Daily Mail, Canada offers 91 independent schools, including Lakefield College School “which bills itself as ‘the best day and boarding’ establishment in the country, and is steeped in royal history”.

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––For a round-up of the most important stories from around the world - and a concise, refreshing and balanced take on the week’s news agenda - try The Week magazine. Start your trial subscription today –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Although the Sussexes plan to divide their time between Canada and the UK, education consultant Edward Williams thinks Archie will only be enrolled at school in one of the two countries.

“Students of any age crave consistency, structure and discipline,” Williams told the Mail. “It’s necessary not just for their academic growth but their social and emotional health.”

And if his parents decide that school should be in Canada, the seventh in line for the throne is likely to speak differently to the members of his wider family, says University of British Columbia sociolinguist Stefan Dollinger.

“He’s going to talk to other Canadian kids, so he’s most likely to acquire a standard Canadian accent,” Dollinger told CBC Radio.

In the meantime, the couple will probably continue to shield their baby from the public spotlight, predicts royal commentator Richard Fitzwilliams. “They will undoubtedly regulate all Archie’s appearances as they see fit,” he told the Daily Express.

The Sunday Times reports that a “source who knows the Queen” says the monarch will be “very sad to have barely seen Archie, and that he will miss out on growing up with his cousins and wider family”.

But at least there is one aspect of living in Canada that Archie is already enjoying, according to The Sun. Prince Harry revealed this week that his son, who has been in North America since before Christmas, “saw snow for the first time the other day and thought it was bloody brilliant”.

Recommended

English football fan disorder ‘getting worse’
Aston Villa’s Matty Cash and Lucas Digne were struck by a bottle at Goodison Park
In Focus

English football fan disorder ‘getting worse’

Has Sue Gray seen ‘smoking gun’ evidence?
A police officer at the door of No. 10 Downing Street
Today’s big question

Has Sue Gray seen ‘smoking gun’ evidence?

Covid-19 face mask stand-off splits postal bosses and workers
A production line manufacturing N95 masks
The latest on . . .

Covid-19 face mask stand-off splits postal bosses and workers

Explained: what is the energy price cap?
Energy bills will increase when the energy price cap is reviewed
Business Briefing

Explained: what is the energy price cap?

Popular articles

Why is New Zealand shutting its borders again?
Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern adjusts her face mask following a press conference
In Depth

Why is New Zealand shutting its borders again?

Djokovic vs. Nadal vs. Federer: career records and grand slams
Novak Djokovic, Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer have all won 20 grand slam singles titles
Profile

Djokovic vs. Nadal vs. Federer: career records and grand slams

Best properties: Grade I buildings
Grid of five houses
The wish list

Best properties: Grade I buildings

The Week Footer Banner