In Review

What’s on this weekend? From Crip Camp to Feeding Britain

Your guide to what’s worth seeing and reading this weekend

The Week’s best film, TV, book and live show on this weekend, with excerpts from the top reviews.

TELEVISION: Pilgrimage: The Road to Istanbul

Deepika Rajani for iNews

“A range of celebrities are embarking on a journey of discovery and adventure in the latest series of BBC Two's Pilgrimage series. Following on from the success of the first two series, seven new stars will be seen travelling to Istanbul where they live as simple pilgrims following an ancient military route to the historic city of Istanbul, which has been transformed into a modern-day path of peace. Having left their luxuries at home, the celebrities don backpacks and walking boots as they become accustomed to their new way of life, which will include staying in basic hostels, sleeping in shared dorms, and following a largely untrodden route."

9pm, 27 March on BBC Two

MOVIE: Crip Camp

Peter Travers for Rolling Stone

“Produced by Michelle and Barack Obama and directed by Nicole Newnham with Jim LeBrecht, this indispensable documentary defines what it means to call a movie ‘inspiring’. Their raucous fist-bump of a film is a 1950s origin story about Camp Jened, affectionately nicknamed ‘Crip Camp,’ a New York summer getaway for kids with disabilities. Located near Woodstock, the camp was basically run by inexperienced hippies, including founder Larry Allison, with their hearts in the right place. By the 1970s, Crip Camp had become a haven for kids, including LeBreacht (born with spina bifida), who found they could laugh, flirt, fight and be themselves away from a world they often felt alienated from.”

Released on 25 March on Netflix

BOOK: Feeding Britain by Tim Lang

Simon Jenkins in The Times

“In the course of my reading, coronavirus struck. Suddenly his message was relevant, indeed important. If Lang had seemed in a 1940s time warp, so now do we all. The health secretary has told Britons to think of the Blitz and thousands dying. There have been bans on people moving. There are closed borders, empty shelves and broken supply chains. At the merest cough, farmers are told to quarantine themselves and shopkeepers shut their doors. Communities have turned inwards. The buzzword is isolation... We will not starve, but thousands will lose their jobs and the nation will grow poorer. Security matters, and that includes food security. Lang has performed a public service.”

Published 26 March

STAGE: Cyprus Avenue

Rosemary Waugh for The Stage

“The production has the air of a slick, well-oiled machine – albeit a machine capable of chomping its audience up into tiny pieces then vomiting out the remains... [Stephen] Rea is the epicentre of the production. He gives a phenomenal performance. Slouched in a too-big suit, he looks like his whole being has crumpled in on itself. He’s terrifying and hilarious – or maybe it’s just terrifying that he’s capable of being hilarious.”

Available on the Royal Court Theatre’s website from 12pm on 27 March until 26 April

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