In Review

Simply chic: four labels to love

A dress code for purists who love classic designs with a twist

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Soft Touch 

Sandra Sandor launched her label Nanushka after graduating from the London College of Fashion in 2005. The Hungarian-born designer’s forte is color and texture, and this season she has stuck to a palette of golden earthy and vanilla cream tones for her Greco-inspired collection of sweeping loose-knit dresses, soft satin gowns and elegant tailored suiting. Her frayed rustic-weave pants and macramé lapel shirt — both pictured—strike the perfect balance between elegance and edginess. Perfect for post-beach promenades in the sun. nanushka.com

Creative Cardis 

The humble cardigan is the star of the show at Alanui,a knitwear brand founded by sibling duo Nicolò and Carlotta Oddi. The young Italians set up their chic folksy label with one mission in mind: to turn this underrated wardrobe staple into a unique statement piece. What’s more, each cardi takes up to 15 hours to create, using handicrafts including dense fringing, intarsia and quilt patchworking. Alanui’s SS20 collection takes its creative cues from the glam ’60s/’70s poolside photos of Slim Aarons, bringing tropical decadence and splashes of cerulean magic to plush knitwear and gossamer separates. Pictured: Alanui Into The Blue cardigan, see alanui.it for stockists. 

Modesty rules

Launched in 2016, Batsheva Hay’s eponymous label fuses modest dressing with a highly feminized aesthetic of flounce, florals and frills. Informed by her Jewish faith, Hay first hit the headlines with her colorful prairie dresses—although never revealing and always respectful of traditional hemlines, these silhouettes were a refreshing rebellion against drab conservatism. This season, inspired by a love of Victorian styles, she brings us a collection full of whimsy and delightful contradictions, including coquettish petticoats and knickerbockers in clashing patterns. batsheva.com

Footwear for purists

Berlin-based shoemakers Luisa Dames and Constantin Langholz- Baikousis founded their digital luxury label Aeydē in 2015 with a clear directive to produce season-to-season classics. The best way to describe their ankle boots, mules and ballet flats is to say that they are sculpturally pure—totally unfussy, with an onus on craft. Each pair is handmade in Italy, and the designers collaborate exclusively with family-owned factories. There’s nothing you can’t wear these python-print mules with. Pictured: Aeydē Katti python-print mules, aeyde.com

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