In Review

Watches with a James Bond twist

A look at the 007 tribute timepieces from Omega and Breitling

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Omega

The delay of No Time to Die, the 25th instalment of the film franchise, didn’t stop Omega from pushing forward with its new Bond edition timepieces - which score high on style even if you aren’t a massive 007 fan. It helps if you are though, because these special editions make cool nods to the movie franchise.

The first of the family was the 42mm vintage look Omega Seamaster Diver 300M 007 Edition (above) with “tropical” brown aluminium dial and bezel ring with blackened hands and indexes, nicely finessed with a retro looking mesh titanium bracelet. The case back bears a pleasing “spy” touch too: a series of engraved numbers styled on old military-issue watches, with the code for Navy personnel (0552) and the letter “A” to indicate the watch has a screw-in crown. Look closely and you’ll also see the number “62”, which signifies the year of the first Bond film.

Omega Seamaster Diver 300M 007 Edition with titanium strap; £7,880 

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Fast forward a little and you have the Omega Seamaster Diver 300M James Bond Numbered Edition (above), an ultra-luxe sleek black watch with a platinum-gold case. Its handsome “Bond” look is enhanced with a classic 007 symbol: the dial has a spiraling gun barrel design in 18K white gold. 

Heightening this sense of fandom are some fun design details. Switch the lights low, and this Bond turns on the charm, much like the protagonist himself. You’ll see the glow of a number 50 within the Super-LumiNova of the 10 o’clock index, a reference to the 50th anniversary of the James Bond film On Her Majesty’s Secret Service. Furthermore, the 007 sits at 7 o’clock and the Bond family coat-of-arms at 12 o’clock (there’s a second coat of arms on the case back). 

Omega Seamaster Diver 300M James Bond Numbered Edition; £44,480

Breitling 

Brietling’s Top Time limited edition is a reworking of a secret agent special. In the 1965 Bond film Thunderball, it graces the wrist of Sean Connery who uses its sneaky gadgetry to locate underwater missiles and avert a nuclear disaster. This iteration sadly doesn’t have a Geiger counter for measuring radiation, which is probably a good thing because imagine how many conspiracy theorists would be queuing outside Breitling to get one. 

The watchmaker has, however, sprinkled some magic. It is the first model to be offered with a blockchain-based “passport”: a digital certificate of authenticity which can easily be exchanged between owners. In essence, this is a solid stamp of security to compliment Breitling’s existing digital warranty program. As for its looks, the Top Time is pure retro, emphasised by the stitched brown leather strap and distinctive two-toned face, known affectionately as the “Zorro” dial. 

A limited edition of 2000; £4,100. 

Where to wear it 

Sölden in Austria is a high altitude resort with pristine slopes and excellent spy credentials: the chase sequence in Spectre was filmed on the area’s longest run. If you remember, it’s not a pursuit performed on skis: Villain Hinx, played by the pleasingly menacing Christoph Waltz, and his henchmen kidnap Madeleine and drive down the mountain whilst Bond pursues them in a plane.

You can follow the route yourself by skiing down on Piste no.30 leading from Rettenbach Glacier to the valley floor. Head to the ice Q restaurant for the après-ski. This futuristic cube perched on a cliff is a gourmet haven and features as Hinx’s lair in the film. 

central-soelden.com

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