In Brief

McLaren’s 765LT is its spiciest model yet

The 765LT is a real wild ride, but it’s not too hot to handle

The Carolina Reaper has been named the hottest chilli in the world, 200 times spicier than a jalapeno, and far too hot to use in normal cooking. Think of the McLaren 765LT as the Carolina Reaper in car form, says Adam Binnie in Car magazine. The McLaren 720S already provided more power and grip than you could ever realistically need. The new 765LT is “even hotter” – “faster, lighter and more powerful than any previous car with the LT badge”.

The numbers “don’t really do it justice” – it is “shockingly fast” at road legal speeds and from there, “it just doesn’t let up”. The engine “rips through its revs” alarmingly, the power delivery is “immediate and urgent, willing you on with gearshifts that are seamless on the way up and back-thumpingly fierce on the way back down”. To top it off, it “sounds furious… angry, raw and metallic regardless of engine or road speed”.

McLaren 765 LT

Patrick Gosling

It feels like “something of an explosive celebration” of McLaren’s current era, says Matt Saunders on Autocar – “a yardstick… by which we might measure just how far it has developed in its first decade of continuous car production”, taking the McLaren driving experience to “spectacular” new heights. It is, depending on which options you choose, up to 80kg lighter than the car it’s based on.

In fact, “every external panel and functioning aerodynamic feature on this car can be made out of carbon fibre”, if you’re prepared to pay extra. “It’s practically standing there in crêpe paper underpants.” The weight saving makes it “startlingly quick”, but it’s also stable with powerful brakes. The result is “probably the most entertaining car that McLaren has built”. 

McLaren 765 LT

The 4.0-litre, twin turbo V8 engine makes 756bhp, and goes from 0-62mph in 2.7 seconds, says Sean Carson on Auto Express. “The more impressive statistic is that it will streak from 0-124mph in seven seconds dead. Forget supercar rivals, that’s superbike-fast.” It also brakes, steers and turns effortlessly, yet is not intimidating to drive. “The sensations it feeds back… inspire confidence.” This is a serious machine “that indulges you”. 

The driving position is superb too, says Top Gear. The low position allows you to feel the vibrations and hear the car roar over every inch of the road; the dashboard is lean, the steering wheel firm in your hands. The car is even a relatively practical proposition – perfect for a weekend away, with a 150-litre boot and 210-litre back deck. In short, it looks fantastic, the ride is wild and it will keep you on your toes. “Take your brave pills and strap in.”

This article was originally published in MoneyWeek

 

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