In Brief

Porsche 911 Turbo and Turbo S facelift finally revealed

Faster 911 Turbo models are coming in 2016

Porsche has revealed its new 911 Turbo and Turbo S models for 2016, to debut in the flesh at the Detroit motor show in January. The tweaked models come with a power boost in the region of 20bhp each, as well as a few midlife styling changes.

The refreshed Turbo model now packs 533bhp from its 3.8 litre twin turbo-charged flat six thanks to modified inlet ports, new injection nozzles, and higher fuel pressure. The power hike means that the 911 Turbo will do 0-62 mph in three seconds flat, and top speed is up to 198 mph.

The Turbo S uses the same 3.8 litre flat six but attached are two new turbo-chargers with larger compressors. Its power output is now rated at 572bhp, meaning it now ducks under the three second mark on a 0-62 mph dash, completing it in 2.9 seconds and topping out at 205 mph.

Both feature Porsche's new 'Dynamic Boost' system for improved throttle response - by interrupting fuel injection instead of closing the throttle, boost is maintained. Small lifts of the throttle are met with less turbo lag when getting back on the power afterwards.

According to Porsche, the new, more powerful car is also slightly more efficient. They claim 31mpg for the coupe and 30 for the cabriolet, thanks to changes to the engine management system and new gear mapping.

There are no Torque figures available yet, but Autocar doesn't expect there to be any gains, considering the limits of the Turbo's seven-speed dual-clutch gearbox and four-wheel drive system.

Visually, the facelift amounts to a small nip and tuck. A re-shaped nose with LED slashes gives the car a slightly wider look than it had before. There are also new 20-inch wheels available, and a few changes at the rear of the car.

There are changes inside too. A new steering wheel inspired by the one found on Porsche's £650,000-plus supercar, the 918 Spider, sits in front of the driver. There's also an updated multimedia system, with internet-enabled sat-nav mapping. Routes can be displayed with 360-degree and satellite imagery, and the seven-inch touchscreen can now interpret handwritten inputs.

The Turbo models in Porsche's line are being updated just as the entry level cars of the 911 range make the switch to turbo-charging too.

The new face-lifted Carrera coming in 2016 will use a 3.0 litre twin turbo flat six as the company begins a drive towards greater fuel economy, pursuing the benefits of turbo power over the naturally aspirated engines which historically have given 911s so much of its character.

Some reviewers have expressed concerns that the new engines will make base 911s much faster than the models they replace, but that they will not be as engaging to drive and will lose some of the car's essence. The change is probably the biggest shift in the 911's 52 year existence, and the facelifted cars coming next year are a bridge towards an all-new 911 towards the end of the decade.

The downsizing won't stop at the 911 though, and [1] Car magazine has reported that turbos are coming eventually to the Boxster and Cayman models at some stage in 2016 too. It's likely that these models could even use four-cylinder engines.

Prices will start at £126,925 for the Turbo and £145,773 for the Turbo S. Those wanting a cabriolet will have to pay around a £9,000 premium on top of that for each modell. First deliveries of the tweaked Turbos will come in January 2016.

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