In Brief

Reflect on Christian values at Christmas, says David Cameron

Prime Minister highlights the importance of 'security' in annual festive message

David Cameron has used his Christmas message to underline the importance of security and to urge people to reflect on Britain's Christian values.

The Prime Minister said that the country's religious foundations meant people should spend time thinking about the meaning of Christmas.

"As a Christian country, we must remember what Jesus Christ's birth represents: peace, mercy, goodwill and, above all, hope.

"I believe that we should also reflect on the fact that it is because of these important religious roots and Christian values that Britain has been such a successful home to people of all faiths and none."

In the address, which The Guardian says had "some uncanny echoes" of the Prime Minister's key general election message, Cameron also went on to highlight the importance of national security.

"If there is one thing people want at Christmas, it's the security of having their family around them and a home that is safe," he said.

In a similar vein, the Prime Minister paid tribute to the armed forces, who were "in the skies of Iraq and Syria, targeting the terrorists that threaten those countries and our security at home" as well as saving migrants attempting to cross the Mediterranean.

"It is because they face danger that we have peace," he added.

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn, who was last week mocked for his choice of Christmas card, chose not to issue a specific Christmas message, but did say in a Sunday Mirror article last weekend that many low-paid workers could not afford to take time off over Christmas, and that homelessness was increasing with tens of thousands of people spending the festive season in temporary accommodation.

People should ask themselves whether they could do more for others, he said.

"Jesus said: 'It is more blessed to give than to receive'", he wrote.

"It is a similar maxim that inspired our party: 'From each according to their means, to each according to their needs.'"

In their respective messages, Green Party leader Natalie Bennett called for a "different sort of society" while Lib Dem Tim Farron said the world was "in need of hope".

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