In Brief

Abuse victims name senior figures amid hush-money claims

'Former manager' reported to be involved, while allegations spread to former QPR scout

Football's sex abuse scandal continues to escalate, with claims that several clubs paid hush-money to victims and allegations that several people "in the senior echelons" of the game have been repeatedly named by victims.

Those figures include "a former manager", claims The Guardian.

New body the Offside Trust, which was set up at the weekend to help victims, told the paper it was "extremely worrying" that there had been so many accounts from former and current footballers implicating people still involved in the game.

It also told The Times "that up to four more clubs paid hush money to settle complaints".

It was reported last week that Chelsea paid a former player, Gary Johnson, £50,000 last year after he made allegations against Eddie Heath, a scout for the club in the 1970s.

Johnson is one of more than 20 former footballers to come forward with allegations of abuse following former Crewe player Andy Woodward going public about his ordeal as a young player three weeks ago.

"To date, there are 55 amateur and professional football clubs linked to allegations of abuse, with several having confirmed their own inquiries," says the BBC.

Charlton Athletic, Chelsea, Crewe Alexandra and Manchester City have opened investigations into allegations of historical abuse. Other clubs have also been dragged into the scandal.

Southampton are "fully supporting" Hampshire Police in its investigations and Newcastle say they will "co-operate fully" with the "relevant authorities", reports the BBC.

On Tuesday, it emerged that former QPR employee Chris Gieler, who died in 2004, had also been accused.

"He was employed by the west London side for 30 years, working in youth development and as chief scout," says the BBC.

The Football Association has also launched its own inquiry, but it is already facing criticism

"The FA has appointed a QC, Kate Gallafent, to oversee its investigation but some of the victims have questioned whether it can truly be considered an independent inquiry if the governing body is paying the person investigating its own role," says the Guardian.

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