Getting to grips with . . .

Home interiors: design trends to look out for in 2021

Experts share their top tips for giving your rooms a makeover

With everyone spending most of their time at home, it’s no surprise that property upgrades and renovations are on a lot of people’s must-do list in 2021. 

From extensions and refitting rooms to new furniture and household items, there’s plenty you can do with your abode to give it a makeover or upgrade. 

To help keep your home up to date, Studio L, London founder Laura Marino, Albion Nord creative director Camilla Clarke, and Jouin Manku founding partner Sanjit Manku pick out the interior design trends to watch out for this year.

Interiors at Westminster Fire Station will be completed by Studio L, London

Interiors at Westminster Fire Station will be completed by Studio L, London

Candy floss colours

Interior design practice Studio L, London has designed the interiors at Westminster Fire Station in Victoria, a new development featuring 17 apartments which is set to complete this year. Studio L, London founder Laura Marino talks through her design predictions for 2021. 

“We still think you’ll be seeing a lot of pastels but mixed with slightly more saturated and (in instances) acidic hues, especially when we head towards spring and summer,” says Marino. “Curved furniture will still be very big and especially attractive in colours such as mint green, acid or lemon yellows, dusty or hot pinks. Just imagine going into your favourite bakery or candy store - this trend is evocative of a simpler, more innocent time.”

Old fashioned bedding

“We predict seeing a rise in handmade items, authentic looking bedding like crocheted blankets and afghans, eiderdowns, quilts, floral patterned sheets, coverlets and in general a more ‘folksy’ type of layering, reminiscent of when bedding was made for function rather than just decoration,” says Marino. 

Interiors at Westminster Fire Station will be completed by Studio L, London

Interiors at Westminster Fire Station will be completed by Studio L, London

Dried flowers and grasses

“This is already trending but it hasn’t hit the tipping point yet,” says Marino. “Again it’s a part of this whole ‘Cottagecore’, ‘granny chic’ vibe. People want their places to look homegrown and crafty to a degree - completely authentic. Natural elements and comforting textures remain very important to help people feel connected to something real but also nest in their home surroundings. It’s easy to do yourself as well which makes it particularly attractive.  Don’t be surprised to see wheatsheaf, dried pampas grasses, pussywillows, craspedia, pharlaus, largarus – you name it, in people’s homes.”

Chenille

“While bouclé and coloured bouclé are still very popular, chenille is on the rise as an alternative,” says Marino. “It’s not just for your grandma’s sweater anymore. We’re seeing chenille in all sorts of textural variations and colourways to make it more modern and attractive to touch.”

Tile alternatives and sustainable surfaces

Marino says: “To get that aged, tactile and comforting look of patina, I think we’ll be seeing more with paint and plaster techniques and ones that can also be used in wet spaces and are sustainable. Things like Béton Ciré, Tadelakt and marmorino.”

The Wellington desk features in The Chelsea Barracks Collection

The Wellington desk features in The Chelsea Barracks Collection

Reimagining of forgotten furniture

Chelsea Barracks in London has partnered with Albion Nord to launch The Chelsea Barracks Collection. The collection of bespoke artisan crafted homeware features The Wellington desk (pictured above). It retains the portability and simplicity of the original campaign desk whilst including special details such as the lion claw feet and the Chelsea Barracks rose marking, which is featured on the desk’s key.

Camilla Clarke, creative director at Albion Nord, says: “Antique, repurposed, salvaged and vintage pieces along with old designs reimagined will re-emerge in 2021. For example, the campaign desk, once used by officers and their staff during military campaigns, with several features that made it easy to transport. In a time where a large number of us are working from home, a portable campaign desk is the perfect answer.”

Natural materials

Light timbers, rattan furniture, and muted lightweight linen fabrics all feature in The Chelsea Barracks Collection. Clarke explains: “The use of natural and sustainable materials, such as timber, stone and linens are becoming increasingly popular in interiors and furniture. Natural pippy oak, honed limestones, rattan and linen are some of the most sought after materials, displacing harmful plastics and synthetic fabrics in upholstery. Homeowners are searching for authenticity in their homes and using natural materials is a great way to achieve that.”

The show apartment at Mayfair Park Residences

The show apartment at Mayfair Park Residences

Organically shaped furniture 

We’re starting to see the ditching of the once-popular hard lines, and sharp edges of post-modern minimalist design, and increased use of curves and softer, more feminine shapes across homewares, furniture and interiors, creating a calming ambiance that is softer on the eye.

Parisian design duo Jouin Manku have incorporated curves throughout the interiors of their latest project, Mayfair Park Residences - the first Dorchester Collection-branded residences - using a blend of custom-designed furniture such as oval marble-clad bathtubs, curved open hearths and cocoon-like headboards.

“The best way to create a space that is comfortable and induces calm is to create a setting with elements that reflect the natural environment, that is sculpted by forces of nature to create soft, organic, curved formations,” says Sanjit Manku, founding partner of Jouin Manku. 

“In the design of Clivedale London’s Mayfair Park Residences we emulated this to create a space that has a natural sense of flow, without interruption from bold corners and harsh lines, drawing you into the residence. Features such as oval marble-clad bathtubs, curved open hearths and cocoon-like headboards in the apartments have worked to create a consoling and comforting atmosphere in the middle of central London.”

Vaulted terrace at one of the townhouses at Mayfair Park Residences

The vaulted terrace at one of the townhouses at Mayfair Park Residences

Exterior design 

With a big focus on outdoor socialising, it is predicted there will be a rise in the investment of outdoor areas - be it gardens, balconies, terraces or even courtyards. There was an increasing interest in outdoor furnishings, rugs and lighting last year, and according to Technavio, the global outdoor furniture market size is expected to grow by $8.27bn (£6bn) from 2020 to 2024. 

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