In Brief

Welsh coal worker discovers his father was a Malaysian sultan

Keith Williams wants to find out if his royal relative left him an inheritance

A coal merchant from South Wales is battling to claim his inheritance after discovering that he is the first-born son of the late 33rd Sultan of Perak in Malaysia.

Keith Williams, 66, was adopted when he was two years old and spent 20 years working in his adoptive father’s coal business in Penygroes, near Llanelli. He only found out about his royal bloodline after deciding to look for his biological family as an adult.

According to the Daily Mirror, Williams flew out to Malaysia to meet his new family, but claims he was ignored. Williams has stressed he is not vying for the Malaysian throne but is determined to claim any inheritance his father may have left him.

Idris Iskandar Al-Mutawakkil Alallahi Shah served as the 33rd Sultan of the Malaysian state of Perak from 1963 until he died of a heart attack in 1984. Before he became sultan, he met Williams’s mother while studying in the UK and she became pregnant, reports The Scottish Sun.

Williams first tracked down his biological mother in his 40s. He told the Mirror: “I had jet black hair and darker skin but I had a fantastic upbringing and my adoptive parents told me about my mum when I was 13.

“I never imagined I was related to a royal family from the other side of the world.”

He added: “I am sure my father knew about me and if he did I am sure he would have left something behind for me and I think it is only right I know about it.”

Of Malaysia’s 13 states, nine are ruled by sultans, who live lavish lifestyles in grand palaces and are each worth many millions. 

Williams says that even if his own royal family doesn’t want him to have his father’s inheritance, he still wants them to include him in their life. He has met his half-sister, Ku Ess, during a trip to Malaysia to visit his father’s tomb.

His younger half-brother stands to become the next sultan following the death of the current Perak ruler, Oxford University-educated Nazrin Shah.

“To be honest, I find it sad and a little annoying they are ignoring me... I am certain he would have known about me but the Establishment would have stopped him from doing anything about it,” said Williams, who is writing a book about his life. 

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