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Give the gift of reading all year round

There are many ways to encourage reading – giving choice is one of the most powerful

A row of children's books

While the last 18 months have been incredibly challenging for people living in the UK, there’s a silver lining to be found in a National Literacy Trust survey conducted during the first lockdown of 2020. The results revealed that in this period of enforced downtime, many children were rediscovering the joy of reading.

The research concluded that more than a third of eight to 18-year-olds were reading much more than they had been before the pandemic, while a further Nielsen survey found that two-thirds of younger readers polled were broadening their horizons by sampling new authors and genres.

The benefits of reading for children have been well documented. One study from the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) discovered that reading for pleasure is the single biggest indicator of a child’s future success. So much so, in fact, that it had a greater impact than family circumstances or their parents’ education and income.

As life begins to return to normal and more distractions come into view, how do parents help support their children’s reading habits and encourage them to embrace a wider choice of books, authors and stories? One simple way to do this is by introducing them to a Bookily card.

Bookily gives readers a budget to spend on new books each month, encouraging them to explore the literary world and discover new perspectives. Think of it as a pocket money card for books.

Since Bookily is powered by National Book Tokens, it can be used at big high street retailers like Waterstones and WHSmith, hundreds of local independent bookshops across the country, and online. Plus, recipients can convert their Bookily balance into an eGift and save it on their phones, so they always have it with them.

Managing a Bookily card is easy, too. Recipients can set up an account with their own personal dashboard, allowing them to check their balance, register reading preferences, view recommendations and take part in fun quizzes and competitions. A simple link can be shared with friends and family members so they can give the Bookily card holder extra top ups for special occasions.

With a Bookily card, readers can feel empowered to explore stories that inspire, reward and entertain them. They can choose the books they want, when they want – and most importantly of all, it’ll set them off on a journey of lifelong reading.

Buy Bookily for the booklover in your life now at www.bookily.co.uk

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