In Brief

Anonymous threatens China over Hong Kong protests

Hacktivists say they will wage war on China for its 'inhumane actions' by leaking thousands of sensitive documents

The online activist group Anonymous has warned China that it is about to launch a large-scale attack on its government websites in support of the pro-democracy campaign in Hong Kong.

It says the attack, coordinated under the banner 'Operation Hong Kong' and expected to begin tomorrow, will involve leaking tens of thousands of sensitive documents and will lead to a blackout across all government sites.

China's Ministry of Public Security, the Ministry of Defence, Ministry of Justice and Hong Kong police are among its many targets, according to Reuters.

"China, you cannot stop us. You should have expected us before abusing your power against the citizens of Hong Kong," the group said in a statement.

"Here's your heads up, prepare for us, try to stop it, the only success you will have will be taking all your sites offline."

The so-called Umbrella Revolution in Hong Kong began last month when tens of thousands of students and activists took to the streets to demand democratic elections in the former British colony.

Earlier this month Anonymous issued a statement promising to help demonstrators.

The group has previously used cyber attacks to campaign for civil liberties and says it had "heard [the protesters'] plea for help".

Previous targets of the group's attacks include the Zimbabwean government, Visa and Interpol. 

"You are not alone in this fight," the group said to protesters in Hong Kong. "Anonymous members all over the world stand with you and will help in your fight for democracy."

Activists said they were watching police closely and had already begun to "wage war" on China for "inhumane actions" against its citizens.

Beijing responded by saying: "This kind of internet attack violates the law and social morals, and we have already reported it to the police."  

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