In Brief

English cricket: ECB confirms ‘The Hundred’ will launch in 2020

New 100-ball competition will feature eight teams and ten-ball overs

The England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) has confirmed “The Hundred” competition will launch in 2020 and playing conditions have been agreed.

According to Sky Sports the new tournament, for men and women, will see eight city-based teams playing 100-ball matches. The introduction of ten-ball overs will mean that the six-ball over format “will be abandoned for the first time domestically in 72 years”, The Daily Telegraph reports.

An ECB statement said: “The Cricket Committee recommendation for playing conditions in the new competition - agreed by the board - is for; each innings to be 100 balls, a change of end after every ten balls and an individual bowler able to deliver either five or ten consecutive balls with a maximum of 20 per game.”

The ECB has also agreed the next steps for a number of key projects including:

  • A new five-year strategy for the game 
  • County Partnership Agreement (CPA)
  • A new structure for current county competitions

Tom Harrison, chief executive officer of the ECB, said: “The game has made huge progress this year, through collaboration, constructive debate and a volume of detailed discussion.

“The outcomes for all of this combined work are vital for the growth and sustainability of cricket, at all levels, in England and Wales.

“The strategy we have created over the last 12 months will give the whole game clear priorities and allow us to deliver these together. It will guide our investment, drive our relationships, and make things happen locally and nationally.

“The strategy, domestic structure, new competition and CPA are all interlinked so it is right that we share all the details – together and in context – at the same time across the game. This will happen in the New Year.”

100-ball cricket: how it will work

When will it start?

The Times reports that the new eight-team domestic competition will be played over five weeks in July and August 2020. The eight city-based teams will have squads of 16 or 17 players.

How will it work?

Each team will face 100 balls in their innings. Ten-ball overs will mean the bowlers will change ends ten times during the match, instead of 19 times in Twenty20 matches. An individual bowler will be able to deliver either five or ten consecutive balls with a maximum of 20 per game.

Where will games be played?

The BBC reported in April that Southampton, Birmingham, Leeds, London, Manchester, Cardiff and Nottingham will host games. Lord’s and The Oval in London will host newly-created teams.

Will it be shown on TV?

Yes, from 2020-2024, the BBC and Sky Sports will broadcast live matches from the new men’s and women’s domestic tournaments. Games will start at 2.30pm and 6.30pm with eight games live on the BBC and the rest on Sky Sports.

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