In Brief

Premier League fans rage over ticket prices as TV money rises

Only two clubs cut season ticket prices despite new television deal that will earn millions

FOOTBALL supporters are up in arms over increased season ticket prices at Premier League clubs next season, even though teams in the division will begin to reap the rewards of a lucrative new TV deal next term. The Sun reports that the top flight will share out £5.5bn in TV revenue under the terms of the new agreement "but that cash will not be used to reward fans". It says that only two clubs, Fulham and Sunderland, have reduced season ticket prices for next season and that out of all the clubs that are increasing their charges, none won any silverware. The paper singles out Spurs as a club that is hiking the cost of a season ticket "despite failing to deliver Champions League football". It adds that, given the vast sums in play, increased ticket prices make little difference to a club's overall revenue. "The increases have upset supporters as the extra money will not make any impact on future success," it explains. Katrina Law, secretary of the Tottenham Supporters' Trust, told the paper: "It is not a massive increase and will generate around £740,000 by our calculations. That wouldn't be enough to sign a player or pay for anyone's wages." Meanwhile Liverpool's Spirit of Shankly supporters group has denounced "inflation-busting price rises [that] are an insult to long-standing supporters". Last season’s champions Manchester United led the way with £61m in broadcast payments, while QPR at the bottom of the table received less than £40m. But next term even the team finishing at the foot of the table is expected to bank more than United managed this year. Earlier this month the Daily Mail reported that one in ten season ticket holders at a top-flight club would not renew their pass next season because of the cost, and almost a quarter were unsure if they could afford to buy another season ticket. At Arsenal, where season tickets can cost in excess of £1,900, fans claimed a fair price would be £766, but that is more than £200 less than the cheapest season ticket.

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