In Depth

Porsche 718 Cayman GT4 RS: Spy shots, engine specs, price and release

Fresh spy images reveal racing car looks and interior details

An RS version of Porsche’s entry-level Cayman sports car has been in high demand among the company’s fans - and now it looks set to become a reality. 

Spy photographers have spotted a development version of the carmaker’s 718-generation Cayman, featuring a new rear wing and more aggressive styling, being put to the test around the Nurburgring circuit in Germany.

The images reveal that the sports car, believed to be the RS model, will sport a number of styling tweaks over the current Cayman GT4, the magazine notes. These include a vented bonnet, a reworked version of the GT4’s front bumper and racing-inspired interior. 

Porsche had already hinted that a hardcore RS version of the marque’s new 718 Cayman GT4 (pictured top) could find its way into production in the near future.

Speaking to Autocar at the Frankfurt Motor Show earlier this week, Dr Frank-Steffen Walliser, the chief engineer on the 911 and 718, said he would “definitely” like to see a GT4 RS version of the Cayman join the range. 

“Everybody’s asking for the RS,” he said. “Can I imagine a GT4 RS? Sure I can. That’s not to say we will make a decision on it yet, as it is a challenge. Would I like such a car? Yes, definitely! Would I like more horses? Yes.”

However, Walliser told the motoring magazine that the GT4 RS “would be a lot more expensive than the normal one”.

While fans patiently wait for an official word from Porsche, here are all the latest reports around the rumoured Cayman GT4 RS

Price and release

The current Cayman GT4 carries a price tag of £75,348, so expect the RS version to cost closer to the £90,000 mark. 

Auto Express says that the prototype snapped in Germany “appears to be at a fairly advanced stage”, suggesting that the car could make its public debut next year.

Design

Porsche’s prototype wears little pre-production camouflage, giving fans a good look at what the final model will be like. 

The most noticeable addition over the regular Cayman GT4 is the massive rear wing, which looks almost identical to the spoiler seen on the development mules for the upcoming 992-generation 911 GT3.

It’s unlikely that the thick wing mounts will remain on the production model, though their design hints at a possible mechanised spoiler system. This could allow drivers to manually change the angle of the wing to either improve straight-line speed or cornering stability.

Other changes include a pair of air ducts sculpted into the bonnet, while the back windows have been replaced by vented panels to help funnel air into the car’s mid-mounted flat-six engine, notes Car magazine. 

Interior

Not only do the latest spy shots give fans a good look at the hardcore sports car, they also offer a glimpse at the stripped-out interior.

According to Motor1, the GT4 RS’s seats look identical to the “thick-bolstered chairs” from the regular GT4, while the steering wheel is wrapped in Alcantara.  

Expect a host of other racing-inspired interior upgrades to make their way into the GT4 RS’s cabin, such as an optional roll cage and six-point harness seatbelts. 

Engine specs and performance

The Cayman GT4 RS is expected to retain the same 4.0-litre flat-six engine as the current GT4, albeit in a higher state of tune. 

That means the car will no doubt exceed the regular GT4’s 414bhp output, with power being sent to the rear wheels.

Auto Express believes that the RS will do away with the GT4’s six-speed manual gearbox and instead feature a PDK automatic transmission in its place.

Will it go hybrid? 

It’s unlikely that the Cayman GT4 RS will get hybrid power, but that doesn’t mean the company isn’t ruling out electrified versions of its signature naturally aspirated GT models. 

In an interview with Autocar, Walliser said that hybrid technology “works well together” with a naturally aspirated engine. That’s because the electric motor provides torque lower down the rev range, while peak power tends to arrive at a higher rpm on non-turbo engines. 

“It could help to keep a normally aspirated engine to survive, and we’re very motivated to do so,” he said.

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