In Depth

Conservative manifesto 2017: Theresa May's key policies

The Week unpicks the Tory party's main pledges and spending proposals

The Conservatives have proposed an election manifesto to "see Britain through Brexit and beyond".

Launching her party's policy pledges in Halifax, Theresa May said her government would work for everyone, not just the privileged few.

"Now more than ever, Britain needs a clear plan," she said. "With this plan and with a strong hand through Brexit, we will build a stronger, fairer, more prosperous Britain, for all of us."

Key policies including slashing immigration and boosting funding for schools and the NHS, as well as a radical overhaul of social care funding.

Here's what the Conservatives promise.

Economy

UK deficit will be wiped by 2025. A United Kingdom Prosperity Fund will replace EU economic aid, which will be administered to areas "where it is needed most".

Tax

The personal tax allowance will increase to £12,500 and the higher tax threshold will rise to £50,000 by 2020. Corporation tax will fall to 17 per cent by 2020 and there will be no VAT rise.

Business and employment

The national living wage will rise to 60 per cent of median earnings by 2020 and people working in the so-called "gig economy" will be properly protected. By 2020, tax-free personal allowance will rise to £12,500 and the 40p tax threshold will rise to £50,000. Corporation tax will fall to 17 per cent and the party vows to increase the levy on firms employing migrant workers.

Families

A Conservative government will introduce 30 hours of free childcare for three and four year olds. People will be able to take a year of unpaid sabbatical leave to care for a family member and a new statutory bereavement leave will be offered to parents.

Housing

The party has committed to building 1.5 million extra homes by 2022. It also promises to halve homelessness over the course of the next parliament and eliminate it by 2027.

Healthcare

NHS spending will increase by a minimum of £8bn in real terms over the next five years. The Tories will trial live online A&E waiting time information and a new GP contract will be introduced.

Education

Schools in England will receive an extra £4bn by 2022. This will be partly funded by scrapping free school lunches for infants in England, which will be replaced with breakfast for all primary pupils. The ban on setting up new grammar schools will be abolished and at least 100 new free schools will be built.

Brexit and immigration

The Tories want to leave the European single market and customs union but seek a "deep and special partnership" with the EU, including a trade agreement. A vote will be held in both Houses of Parliament on the final Brexit deal, but the public will not get a say. They will maintain their pledge to cut annual net migration to the tens of thousands. Students will have to leave the country at the end of their course unless they meet "higher" requirements allowing them to stay.

Security and defence

Trident, the UK's nuclear deterrent, will remain. The defence budget will be increased by at least 0.5 per cent above inflation every year. Better compensation will be offered for injured personnel and the families of those killed in combat. Investment of £1bn will create 10,000 more prison places.

Benefits and pensions

People with assets of more than £100,000 will have to pay for their social care but can defer payment until after their death. Means-tested winter fuel payments will be introduced, taking away £300 from wealthier pensioners.The triple lock pension guarantee will be maintained until 2020, after which it will be replaced with a double lock, meaning pensions will rise in line with earnings or inflation, whichever is highest.

Government

The Tories will continue with current electoral boundary reviews and reduce the number of MPs from 650 to 600. The Fixed Term Parliament Act will be repealed, allowing a prime minister to call an election whenever they like.

Extras

MPs will be given a free vote on repealing the Hunting Act and rail ticketing will be reviewed to remove "complexity and perverse" pricing. Heathrow Airport will expand to a third runway.

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